FARLAND GUIDE 0.85

A world conquered by evil and ruled by the Lords of Sin; A unique campaign setting

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CONTENTS

Credits

The World of Farland©, The Farland Campaign©, The Farland Setting©, this entire website (http://www.farlandworld.com), and all original content and intellectual property is Copyright 2016 S. Baker. All rights reserved. Do not replicate, copy, or use without written permission except for single copies of the materials available through this website. Use it solely for noncommercial, personal use. You may not distribute copies of this material to others, even in electronic format, without written permission. Items created under the open gaming license are exempt from this claim and may be used.

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-S. Baker

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Copyright notice The World of Farland, the entire website, and all non-OGL content is copyright 2016 S. Baker. All rights reserved.

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Artwork Used by Permission of the respective copyright holders:

"Apocalypse" © 2000 Todd Lockwood. "Black Whip" © 2006 Dimitar Nikolov. "Chaos Lord" © 2006 Erik Hilliker. "Character for Kings of the Realm" © 2016 Grafit-art "Demon Summoning" © 2006 Steve Argyle. "Dragonlance" © 1999 Wizards of the Coast. "Dragon Mountains" © 2008 Jason Juta. "TSR Jam" © 1999 Todd Lockwood.

Introduction

Farland is a North European Dark Age Gothic Horror high difficulty campaign setting for Dungeons & Dragons®, a role-playing game. The world of Farland is a meticulously mapped and detailed campaign setting with detailed history spanning many millenia, providing a rich, realistic backdrop. Every clue and detail that players discover will lead them further into the nearly limitless aspects of the world.

Farland as a theme

This North European fantasy world conquered by evil includes Viking-like folk who raid and plunder and the Templar-like knights who endeavor their (un)holy crusades. Pandemic plagues like Black Death and a corrupt king selling his men into slavery are but some aspects of the Dark Age, an era of intellectual depression. Racism, totalitarianism, terrorism, Farland is a world where innocence has lost it's meaning, it is full of natural diseases and characters suffer fatigue due to hunger and thirst and even madness and despair. Characters will find themselves sleeping with their armor on out of fear of an attack during the night. Cruel power-hungering landlords, corrupted by the dark occupation are always seeking for more power. Sorcerers are hunted down like witches and wizards are imprisoned in the infamous wizard towers where they are made tranquil to easily serve as tools for the shadow government. The only god allowed to venerate is the one of evil nature and carrying weapons and armor is forbidden. Spellcasting is forbidden without a license or official permission. Vampires brood on the battlements of their accursed castles. Necromancers toil in dark dungeons to create horrid servants made of dead flesh. Devils corrupt the innocent, and werewolves prowl the night. The war against evil is lost and the goblinoid victors loot, burn, rape, and murder the inhabitants at will-but only for a limited period of time, since it undercuts the goal of establishing a slave population. Farland is important for it is the focus of a war for liberation.

DM's Advice

Before you start creating your character it is recommended that all party members come together to balance out and unite an evil-withstanding party of heroes. It is recommended that you and your Dungeon Master together intensively work out your background to form a bond with your character.

High risk, High reward? Nope.... New characters.

Running the Campaign

The world of Farland is fit to run a long and dreadfull campaign. Forget about the leveling, Farland is all about survival. Starting as a 1st level character it can take years of intensive Dungeons and Dragons sessions before reaching level 20. The tiers of play are hard to reach for heroes are hunted down. One might ask himself what he or she is doing in this rough land called Farland. The answer is to survive. The rule changes makes healing spells and healing abilities much more important. One could also avoid danger, making a stealthy life an healthy life. But when it comes down to fighting toe to toe, make sure you got yourself a strong and capable warrior on the front line. Whatever you play, you will find yourself constantly running and hiding. Life is hard and dangerous in Farland and everywhere people rely on each other, and betray each other. On every corner there is lurking someone, and every greet has it's need. A strong group of characters exists of characters who realize this all to well. Cooperation and survival are the keys to success in Farland. The dungeon master is encouraged to use scenes that build apprehension and fear, culminating in the eventual face-to-face meeting with the Nameless evil(s). Can you cooperate with your fellow players in order to survive these brutal conditions Farland has to offer?

2

INTRODUCTION

Optional Rules

The harshness and grittyness of the world of Farland should reflect in the optional core rules. Here are a few examples that make life in Farland a living hell, yet also more immersive.

Healer's Kit Dependency

A character can't spend any Hit Dice after finishing a short rest until someone expends one use of a healer's kit to bandage and treat the character's wounds (bandages, alcohol, herbs, presumably). With this rule, bleeding, concussed characters won’t just spontaneously heal by resting unless actually treat their wounds.

Slow Natural Healing

Characters don't regain hit points at the end of a long rest. Instead, a character can spend Hit Dice to heal at the end of a long rest, just as with a short rest. This optional rule prolongs the amount of time that characters need to recover from their wounds without the benefits of magical healing and works well for grittier, more realistic campaigns. You still gain half of your hit dice spend from a long rest.

Gritty Realism for NPC's

Gritty realism for NPC's turns short rests into overnight rests (8 hours), and effectively turns long rests into downtime (7 days). For example, a NPC priestess might be able to cast a cure wounds spell, but it takes her a week before she recovers from it and be able to cast it again. Also, when a NPC gets down to 0 hit points, it is generally dead and thus beyond stabilizing. This rule implies that you as a player character are special, mend to succeed where NPC's would surely fail.

Extra Exhaustion Levels

Suffering a critical hit and dropping down to 0 hit points results in one exhaustion level. The exhaustion level gained from a critical hit can only occur once per short rest.

Codex System

The codex system provides players with detailed lore about history, metaphysics, time-lines, deities, symbols, currencies, languages, magic items, poetry, songs, races, beasts, fiends, faeries, celestials, climate, flora, geography, kingdoms, secret places and more. Pay attention, make notes, and delve deep into the mysterious wonders of Farland. Your background, class and race might provide you with a fitting codex, giving you the information you need to further work out your background. For example, a druid understands the geographical lay-out of a certain natural terrain and could start out with the codex 'Sarumvest Forest', providing the player with details only his druid character would know.

The codex system is used for players to bundle specific lore. A Halfling smoking Toby´s finest weed and living peacefully on the far side of the world is probably not acquainted with the codex 'Everyday life in the Conquered Kingdoms.' However, a former slave, rebel or refugee might do. A codex could lead to another codex once your character has acquired enough lore.

Lingering Injuries

In Farland, a deadly blow can leave behind serious inflictions should you survive. You can now suffer long-term injuries by failing a constitution saving throw when you drop to 0 hit points. The DC is determined by the amount of negative hitpoints a character would end up after the deadly blow with a minimum of 10. For example a character with 3 hit points takes 17 damage and must make a DC14 Constitution saving throw or suffer a lingering injury. The result varies from dissolved fingers from acid damage, frozen solid limbs from cold damage, becoming blinded by radiant damage and more.

Short Rest

Players often ask how many short rests they can have on an adventuring day. As a rule, you can set the amount of short rests to 2. You can also rule that to have a short rest, one must have done some adventuring on that day.

Acid
d20 Lingering Injury
1 Blindness. Your eyes are destroyed; you gain the blinded condition. Magic such as the regenerate spell can restore your sight.
2 Partial Blindness. Your eyes are damaged; you have disadvantage on Wisdom (Perception) checks that rely on sight and on ranged attack rolls. Magic such as the regenerate spell can heal the damage to your eyes. If you have already suffered partial blindness, you're blinded.
3 Destroyed Hand. You can no longer hold anything with two hands, and you can hold only a single object at a time. Magic such as the regenerate spell can restore the lost appendage.
4 Destroyed Foot or Leg. Your speed on foot is halved, and you must use a crutch or cane to move. You fall prone after using the Dash action. You have disadvantage on Dexterity checks made to balance. Magic such as the regenerate spell can restore the damaged appendage.
Acid
d20 Lingering Injury
5-7 Major Neuralgia. You are in constant pain from nerve damage. Whenever you attempt an action in combat, you must make a DC 15 Constitution saving throw. On a failed save, you lose your action and can't use reactions until the start of your next turn. Magical healing of 6th level or higher, such as heal and regenerate, cures the neuralgia, or if you spend twenty days doing nothing but resting it resolves on its own.
8-10 Minor Neuralgia. This has the same effect as Major Neuralgia above, except that the save DC is 10, and it only takes ten days to resolve on its own.
11-13 Horrible Disfigurement. You have acid burns to the extent that the scars can't be easily concealed. You have disadvantage on Charisma (Persuasion) checks and advantage on Charisma (Intimidation) checks. Magical healing of 6th level or higher, such as heal and regenerate, removes the acid burn scar.
14-16 Blisters. You have severe blisters. You have disadvantage on Dexterity checks. The blisters heal if you receive magical healing. Alternatively, someone can tend to the blisters and make a DC 15 Wisdom (Medicine) check once every 24 hours. After seven successes, the blisters heal.
17 - 20 Minor Disfigurement. You have acid burn scars, but they don’t have any adverse effect. Magical healing of 6th level or higher, such as heal and regenerate, removes the acid burn scars.
Bludgeoning or Force
d20 Lingering Injury
1 Brain Injury. You have suffered a brain injury. You have disadvantage on Intelligence, Wisdom, and Charisma checks, as well as Intelligence, Wisdom, and Charisma saving throws. If you fail a saving throw against bludgeoning damage, force damage, or psychic damage, you are also stunned until the end of your next turn. Magic such as the regenerate spell can restore your full brain function.
2 Broken leg. Your speed on foot is halved, and you must use a cane or crutch to move. You fall prone after using the Dash action. You have disadvantage on Dexterity checks made to balance. If your leg is splinted with a successful DC 15 Wisdom (Medicine) check, then magical healing of 6th level or higher, such as heal and regenerate, mends the broken leg , or it will heal naturally in 8 weeks. If it is not splinted before it's healed or allowed to heal, the effects remain until it is rebroken and splinted.
3 Broken arm. You can no longer hold anything with two hands, and you can hold only a single object at a time. If your arm is splinted with a successful DC 15 Wisdom (Medicine) check, then magical healing of 6th level or higher, such as heal and regenerate, mends the broken leg, or it will heal naturally in 8 weeks. If it is not splinted before it's healed or allowed to heal, the effects remain until it is rebroken and splinted.
4 Internal Injury. Whenever you attempt an action in combat, you must make a DC 15 Constitution saving throw. On a failed save, you lose your action and can't use reactions until the start of your next turn. Magical healing of 6th level or higher, such as heal and regenerate, cure the injury, or if you spend ten days doing nothing but resting, it will heal naturally.
5-7 Broken Ribs. This has the same effect as Internal Injury above, except that the save DC is 10.
8-10 Major Concussion. You have disadvantage on Intelligence checks, Wisdom checks, and Charisma checks, as well as Constitution saving throws to maintain concentration. Magical healing of 6th level or higher, such as heal and regenerate, cures the concussion. Alternately, it heals on its own in four weeks.
11-13 Minor Concussion. You have disadvantage on Intelligence checks. The concussion heals if you receive any magical healing; alternately it heals on its own in two weeks. If you already have a minor concussion, you suffer a major concussion.
14-16 Severe bruising. You suffer severe bruising over an extensive portion of your anatomy. Anytime you suffer bludgeoning or force damage, you suffer an additional point of bludgeoning or force damage. The bruising heals if you receive magical healing. Alternately, it heals on its own in 2 week.
17 - 20 Broken Nose. Your broken nose is painful but doesn't have any adverse effect. Any magical healing mends your nose, although it may heal crooked if it is crooked when the healing is applied.
Cold
d20 Lingering Injury
1 Ocular Damage. One of your corneas is damaged from frostbite. You have disadvantage on Wisdom (Perception) checks that rely on sight and on ranged attack rolls. Magic such as the regenerate spell can restore the damaged cornea. If you have no corneas that remain undamaged after sustaining this injury, you're blinded.
2 Systemic Damage from Frostbite. You have disadvantage on Strength, Dexterity, and Constitution ability checks and Strength, Dexterity, and Constitution saving throws. Magic such as the regenerate spell cures this damage.
3 Gangrene of the Hand. You can no longer hold anything with two hands, and you can hold only a single object at a time. Magic such as the regenerate spell can restore the crushed appendage.
Cold
d20 Lingering Injury
4 Gangrene of the Foot. Your speed on foot is halved, and you must use a cane or crutch to move. You fall prone after using the Dash action. You have disadvantage on Dexterity checks made to balance. Magic such as the regenerate spell can restore the crushed appendage.
5-7 Major Neuralgia. You have constant, painful nerve damage over a large portion of your body. Whenever you attempt an action in combat, you must make a DC 15 Constitution saving throw. On a failed save, you lose your action and can't use reactions until the start of your next turn. Magical healing of 6th level or higher, such as heal and regenerate, cures the neuralgia, or if you spend twenty days doing nothing but resting it resolves on its own.
8-10 Frostbitten Foot. Your speed on foot is reduced by 5 feet. You must make a DC 10 Dexterity saving throw after using the Dash action. If you fail the save, you fall prone. Magical healing cures the frostbite. Alternately, your foot can be treated with a successful DC 15 Wisdom (Medicine) check, in which case it will heal naturally in 2 weeks.
11-13 Frostbitten hand. Randomly determine which hand has been frostbitten. In order to grasp or manipulate an object with that hand, you must succeed at a DC 15 Dexterity check. Magical healing cures the frostbite. Alternately, your hand can be treated with a successful DC 15 Wisdom (Medicine) check, in which case it will heal naturally in 2 weeks.
14-16 Minor Neuralgia. This has the same effect as Major Neuralgia above, except that the save DC is 10 and it only takes ten days to resolve on its own.
17 - 20 Anosmia. You lose your sense of smell and taste. You automatically fail any ability checks that involve your sense of smell or taste. The condition heals if you receive any magical healing.
Fire
d20 Lingering Injury
1 Lose an Eye. You have disadvantage on Wisdom (Perception) checks that rely on sight and on ranged attack rolls. Magic such as the regenerate spell can restore the lost eye. If you have no eyes left after sustaining this injury, you're blinded.
2 Fourth Degree Burns. You have disadvantage on ability checks and Strength, Dexterity, and Constitution saving throws. If you fail a saving throw against an effect that causes fire damage, you also gain the stunned condition until the end of your next turn. Magic such as the regenerate spell cures this damage. If you already have fourth degree burns, you must succeed at a DC 15 Constitution saving throw or die.
3 Third Degree Burns. You have disadvantage on ability checks and Constitution saving throws. If you fail a saving throw against an effect that causes fire damage, you also gain the stunned condition until the end of your next turn. Magic such as the regenerate spell cures this damage. Alternatively, someone can tend to the burns and make a DC 15 Wisdom (Medicine) check once every week. After ten successes, the burns heal. If you already have third degree burns, you instead suffer fourth degree burns.
4 Second Degree Burns. You have disadvantage on Strength, Dexterity, and Constitution checks. Magic such as the regenerate spell cures this damage. Alternately, they will heal on their own in 4 weeks. If you already have second degree burns, you instead suffer third degree burns.
5-7 Major Neuralgia. You have constant, painful nerve damage over a large portion of your body. Whenever you attempt an action in combat, you must make a DC 15 Constitution saving throw. On a failed save, you lose your action and can't use reactions until the start of your next turn. Magical healing of 6th level or higher, such as heal and regenerate, cures the neuralgia, or if you spend twenty days doing nothing but resting, it resolves on its own.
8-10 Minor Neuralgia. This has the same effect as Major Neuralgia above, except that the save DC is 10, and it will resolve on its own in ten days.
11-13 Horrible Disfigurement. You have burn scars to the extent that can't be easily concealed. You have disadvantage on Charisma (Persuasion) checks and advantage on Charisma (Intimidation) checks. Magical healing of 6th level or higher, such as heal and regenerate, removes the burn scars.
14-16 Blisters. You have severe blisters. You have disadvantage on Dexterity checks. The blisters heal if you receive magical healing. Alternatively, someone can tend to the blisters and make a DC 15 Wisdom (Medicine) check once every 24 hours. After seven successes, the blisters heal.
17 - 20 First Degree Burns. You have superficial but painful burns. Whenever you take fire damage, you take an additional 1 point of damage. Magical healing cures the burns; alternately, they will heal on their own in 2 weeks. If you already have first degree burns, you instead suffer second degree burns.
Lightning
d20 Lingering Injury
1 Brain Injury. You have suffered a brain injury. You have disadvantage on Intelligence, Wisdom, and Charisma checks, as well as Intelligence, Wisdom, and Charisma saving throws. If you fail a saving throw against bludgeoning damage, force damage, or psychic damage, you are also stunned until the end of your next turn. Magic such as the regenerate spell can restore your full brain function.
2 Explosive Grounding of the Hand. You lose a hand. You can no longer hold anything with two hands, and you can hold only a single object at a time. Magic such as the regenerate spell can restore the lost appendage.
Lightning
d20 Lingering Injury
3 Explosive Grounding of the Foot. You lose a foot. Your speed on foot is halved, and you must use a cane or crutch to move unless you have a peg leg or other prosthesis. You fall prone after using the Dash action. You have disadvantage on Dexterity checks made to balance. Magic such as the regenerate spell can restore the lost appendage.
4 Kidney Failure. When you complete a long rest, you must succeed at a Constitution saving throw DC 15 or gain the poisoned condition until you complete a long rest. Magic such as the regenerate spell can cure your kidney failure. Alternatively, someone can tend to the kidney failure and make a DC 15 Wisdom (Medicine) check once every week. After ten successes, the kidney failure is resolved.
5-7 Arc Flash. Roll on the fire table.
8-10 Cardiac Injury. You gain a level of exhaustion which cannot be removed by normal means. If you fail a saving throw against fear or fear effects, you gain another level of exhaustion that can be removed by normal means. Magic such as the regenerate spell can heal your cardiac damage.
11-13 Skeletal Muscle Breakdown. You have disadvantage on Strength checks and Strength saving throws. Magic such as the regenerate spell can cure your muscle breakdown. Alternatively, it will resolve on its own in 6 weeks.
14-16 Muscle Spasms. You have disadvantage on Dexterity checks. Magical healing cures your muscle spasms. Alternatively, they will resolve on their own in 2 weeks.
17 - 20 Flash Burns. You have superficial burns. You turn red as a lobster, but otherwise suffer no mechanical effects. Magical healing cures your flash burns. Alternatively, they will heal on their own in 2 weeks.
Necrotic
d20 Lingering Injury
1 Spiritual Injury. You are afflicted with intense apathy and depression. You have disadvantage on Intelligence, Wisdom, and Charisma ability checks and Intelligence, Wisdom, and Charisma saving throws. Magic such as the heal or regenerate spell can resolve your spiritual injury, but such spells must be cast by a cleric, druid, or other class that uses divine magic.
2 Withered Hand. You lose a hand. You can no longer hold anything with two hands, and you can hold only a single object at a time. Magic such as the regenerate spell can restore the lost appendage.
3 Withered Foot. Your speed on foot is halved, and you must use a cane or crutch to move. You fall prone after using the Dash action. You have disadvantage on Dexterity checks made to balance. Magic such as the regenerate spell can restore the lost appendage.
4 Major Organ Necrosis. Whenever you attempt an action in combat, you must make a DC 15 Constitution saving throw. On a failed save, you lose your action and can't use reactions until the start of your next turn. Magical healing of 6th level or higher, such as heal and regenerate, cures the Major Organ Necrosis.
5-7 Minor Organ Necrosis. This has the same effect as Major Organ Necrosis above, except that the save DC is 10.
8-10 Necrotic Stench. You smell like rotting flesh. You have disadvantage on Charisma (Persuasion) checks. Magical healing of 6th level or higher, such as heal and regenerate, removes the smell.
11-13 Necrotizing Wound. Your hit point maximum is reduced by 1 every 24 hours the wound persists. If your hit point maximum drops to 0, you die. The wound heals if you receive magical healing. Alternatively, someone can tend to the wound and make a DC 15 Wisdom (Medicine) check once every 24 hours. After ten successes, the wound heals.
14-16 Inflammation. Your muscles are irritated and inflamed. You have disadvantage on strength checks. Magical healing resolves the inflammation. Alternately, it will resolve on its own in two weeks.
17 - 20 Necrotic Discoloration. You get white and gray spots on your cheeks. The spots don't have any adverse effect. Magical healing of 6th level or higher, such as heal and regenerate, removes the spots.
Piercing
d20 Lingering Injury
1 Lose an Eye. You have disadvantage on Wisdom (Perception) checks that rely on sight and on ranged attack rolls. Magic such as the regenerate spell can restore the lost eye. If you have no eyes left after sustaining this injury, you're blinded.
2 Throat Injury. You gain a level of exhaustion which cannot be removed by normal means. You also have disadvantage on constitution checks. Magic such as the regenerate spell can heal your throat injury.
3 Groin Injury. Your speed on foot is halved, and you must use a cane or crutch to move. You cannot take the Dash action. You are also sterile. Magic such as the regenerate spell can heal the groin injury.
4 Cardiac Injury. You gain a level of exhaustion which cannot be removed by normal means. If you fail a saving throw against fear or fear effects, you gain another level of exhaustion that can be removed by normal means. Magic such as the regenerate spell can heal your cardiac damage.
5-7 Organ Damage. Whenever you attempt an action in combat, you must make a DC 15 Constitution saving throw. On a failed save, you lose your action and can't use reactions until the start of your next turn. Magic such as the regenerate spell can cure your organ damage. Alternatively, someone can tend to the organ damage and make a DC 15 Wisdom (Medicine) check once every day. After ten successes, the organ damage is resolved.
Piercing
d20 Lingering Injury
8-10 Pierced Stomach. When you complete a long rest, you must succeed at a Constitution saving throw DC 10 or gain the poisoned condition until you complete a long rest. Magical healing of 6th level or higher, such as heal and regenerate, heals the pierced stomach, or if you spend ten days doing nothing but resting, it heals on its own.
11-13 Horrible Scar. You are disfigured to the extent that the wound can't be easily concealed . You have disadvantage on Charisma (Persuasion) checks and advantage on Charisma (Intimidation) checks. Magical healing of 6th level or higher, such as heal and regenerate, removes the scar.
14-16 Festering Wound. Your hit point maximum is reduced by 1 every 24 hours the wound persists. If your hit point maximum drops to 0, you die. The wound heals if you receive any magical healing. Alternatively, someone can tend to the wound and make a DC 15 Wisdom (Medicine) check once every 24 hours. After ten successes, the wound heals.
17 - 20 Minor Scar. The scar doesn't have any adverse effect. Magical healing of 6th level or higher, such as heal and regenerate, removes the scar.
Poison
d20 Lingering Injury
1 Systemic Damage. You have disadvantage on Strength, Dexterity, and Constitution ability checks and Strength, Dexterity, and Constitution saving throws. Magic such as the regenerate spell cures this damage.
2 Major Liver Damage. When you complete a long rest, you must succeed at a Constitution saving throw DC 15 or gain the poisoned condition until you complete a long rest. Additionally, whenever you take poison damage, you take an additional 3 (1d6) poison damage. Anytime you drink alcohol or take another drug, you take 3 (1d6) poison damage. Magic such as the regenerate spell can cure your liver failure.
3 Minor Liver Damage. When you complete a long rest, you must succeed at a Constitution saving throw DC 10 or gain the poisoned condition until you complete a long rest. Additionally, whenever you take poison damage, you take an additional 2 (1d4) poison damage. Anytime you drink alcohol or take another drug, you take 2 (1d4) poison damage. Magic such as the regenerate spell can cure your liver failure.
4 Major Kidney Failure. When you complete a long rest, you must succeed at a Constitution saving throw DC 15 or gain the poisoned condition until you complete a long rest. Magic such as the regenerate spell can cure your kidney failure. Alternatively, someone can tend to the kidney failure and make a DC 15 Wisdom (Medicine) check once every week. After ten successes, the kidney failure is resolved.
5-7 Minor Kidney Failure. This has the same effect as Major Kidney Failure above, except that the save DC is 10 and only six Wisdom (Medicine) check successes are needed to resolve the Kidney Failure.
8-10 Cardiac Injury. You gain a level of exhaustion which cannot be removed by normal means. If you fail a saving throw against fear or fear effects, you gain another level of exhaustion that can be removed by normal means. Magic such as the regenerate spell can heal your cardiac damage.
11-13 Vertigo. You have disadvantage on Dexterity checks. Magic such as the regenerate spell can cure your vertigo. Alternatively, it will resolve on its own in 8 weeks.
14-16 Nausea. You have disadvantage on Constitution checks. Magical healing cures your nausea. Alternatively, it will resolve on its own in 4 weeks.
17 - 20 Minor nausea. You must succeed at a DC 10 Constitution saving throw before you can consume food. Magical healing cures your nausea. Alternatively, it will resolve on its own in 1 week.
Psychic
d20 Lingering Injury
1 Brain Injury. You have suffered a brain injury. You have disadvantage on Intelligence, Wisdom, and Charisma checks, as well as Intelligence, Wisdom, and Charisma saving throws. If you fail a saving throw against bludgeoning damage, force damage, or psychic damage, you are also stunned until the end of your next turn. Magic such as the regenerate spell can restore your full brain function.
2 Indefinite Madness. Roll on the Indefinite Madness table in the Dungeon Masters Guide.
3 Severe headaches. You have disadvantage on Wisdom checks and Wisdom saving throws. If you fail a saving throw against bludgeoning damage, force damage, or psychic damage, you are also stunned until the end of your next turn. Magic such as the regenerate spell can cure your severe headaches.
4 Phobia. You develop a debilitating fear of something in the situation from which you gained your injury. For example, if you were damaged by a mind flayer, you might have a fear of octopuses. The DM will decide. When you are confronted with your phobia, you have disadvantage on all ability checks and saving throws. Magic such as the regenerate spell can cure your phobia.
5-7 Long-term Madness. Roll on the Long-term Madness table in the Dungeon Masters Guide. Your madness lasts twice as long.
8-10 Weak Persona. You have suffered damage to your sense of self. You have disadvantage on Charisma checks. Magic such as the regenerate spell can heal your weak persona. Alternately, it will heal on its own in four weeks.
Psychic
d20 Lingering Injury
11-13 Minor headaches. You have disadvantage on Wisdom checks. Magical healing cures your minor headaches. Alternately, they will resolve on their own in two weeks.
14-16 Inappropriate Volume. You can’t regulate your volume. You shout when you intend to whisper, and whisper when you intend to shout. Magical healing cures your inappropriate volume.
17 - 20 Short-term Madness. Roll on the Short-term Madness table in the Dungeon Masters Guide. Your madness lasts twice as long.
Radiant
d20 Lingering Injury
1 Blindness. Your eyes are destroyed; you gain the blinded condition. Magic such as the regenerate spell can restore your sight.
2 Partial Blindness. Your retinas are damaged; you have disadvantage on Wisdom (Perception) checks that rely on sight and on ranged attack rolls. Magic such as the regenerate spell can restore the lost eye. If you have already suffered partial blindness, you're blinded.
3 Third Degree Burns. You have disadvantage on ability checks and Constitution saving throws. If you fail a saving throw against an effect that causes fire damage, you also gain the stunned condition until the end of your next turn. Magic such as the regenerate spell cures this damage. Alternatively, someone can tend to the burns and make a DC 15 Wisdom (Medicine) check once every week. After ten successes, the burns heal. If you already have third degree burns, you instead suffer fourth degree burns as per the Fire chart.
4 Second Degree Burns. You have disadvantage on Strength, Dexterity, and Constitution checks. Magic such as the regenerate spell cures this damage. Alternately, they will heal on their own in 4 weeks. If you already have second degree burns, you instead suffer third degree burns.
5-7 Large Skin Tumors. You develop several large, painful skin tumors. You have disadvantage on Charisma and Wisdom checks. Magic such as the regenerate spell cures your large skin tumors. If your large skin tumors are not cured within six months, you develop Systemic Damage as per the poison table.
8-10 Small Skin Tumors. You develop several small, painless skin tumor. You have disadvantage on Charisma checks. Magic such as the regenerate spell cures your small skin tumors. If your small skin tumors are not cured within one year, you develop Large Skin Tumors.
11-13 Blisters. You have severe blisters. You have disadvantage on Dexterity checks. The blisters heal if you receive magical healing. Alternatively, someone can tend to the blisters and make a DC 15 Wisdom (Medicine) check once every 24 hours. After seven successes, the blisters heal.
14-16 First Degree Burns. You have superficial but painful burns. Whenever you take fire damage, you take an additional 1 point of damage. Magical healing cures the burns; alternately, they will heal on their own in 2 weeks. If you already have first degree burns, you instead suffer second degree burns.
17 - 20 Hair Loss and Cosmetic Damage. Visible hair on your body burns away but will grow back as normal. If you have any exposed tattoos, they fade as if exposed to 10 years of sunlight.
Slashing
d20 Lingering Injury
1 Lose an Eye. You have disadvantage on Wisdom (Perception) checks that rely on sight and on ranged attack rolls. Magic such as the regenerate spell can restore the lost eye. If you have no eyes left after sustaining this injury, you're blinded.
2 Lose an Arm or a Hand. You can no longer hold anything with two hands, and you can hold only a single object at a time. Magic such as the regenerate spell can restore the lost appendage.
3 Lose a Foot or Leg. Your speed on foot is halved, and you must use a cane or crutch to move unless you have a peg leg or other prosthesis. You fall prone after using the Dash action. You have disadvantage on Dexterity checks made to balance. Magic such as the regenerate spell can restore the lost appendage.
4 Hamstrung. Your speed on foot is reduced by 5 feet. You must make a DC 10 Dexterity saving throw after using the Dash action. If you fail the save, you fall prone. Magic such as the regenerate spell can cure your severed hamstring tendons.
5-7 Major Internal Injury. Whenever you attempt an action in combat, you must make a DC 15 Constitution saving throw. On a failed save, you lose your action and can't use reactions until the start of your next turn. Magical healing of 6th level or higher, such as heal and regenerate, heals the internal injury; alternately, if you spend ten days doing nothing but resting, it heals on its own.
8-10 Minor Internal Injury. This has the same effect as Major Internal Injury above, except that the save DC is 10.
11-13 Horrible Scar. You are disfigured to the extent that the wound can't be easily concealed. You have disadvantage on Charisma (Persuasion) checks and advantage on Charisma (Intimidation) checks. Magical healing of 6th level or higher, such as heal and regenerate, removes the scar.
Slashing
d20 Lingering Injury
14-16 Festering Wound. Your hit point maximum is reduced by 1 every 24 hours the wound persists. If your hit point maximum drops to 0, you die. The wound heals if you receive magical healing. Alternatively, someone can tend to the wound and make a DC 15 Wisdom (Medicine) check once every 24 hours. After ten successes, the wound heals.
17 - 20 Minor Scar. The scar doesn't have any adverse effect. Magical healing of 6th level or higher, such as heal and regenerate, removes the scar.
Thunder
d20 Lingering Injury
1 Brain Injury. You have suffered a brain injury. You have disadvantage on Intelligence, Wisdom, and Charisma checks, as well as Intelligence, Wisdom, and Charisma saving throws. If you fail a saving throw against bludgeoning damage, force damage, or psychic damage, you are also stunned until the end of your next turn. Magic such as the regenerate spell can restore your full brain function.
2 Deafness. Your eardrums have been destroyed; you gain the deafened condition. Magic such as the regenerate spell can restore your hearing.
3 Partial Deafness. Your eardrums have been damaged; you are hard of hearing. You have disadvantage on any ability check that requires hearing. Magic such as the regenerate spell can restore your hearing.
4 Severe Headaches. You have disadvantage on Wisdom checks and Wisdom saving throws. If you fail a saving throw against bludgeoning damage, force damage, or psychic damage, you are also stunned until the end of your next turn. Magic such as the regenerate spell can cure your severe headaches.
5-7 Internal Injury. Whenever you attempt an action in combat, you must make a DC 15 Constitution saving throw. On a failed save, you lose your action and can't use reactions until the start of your next turn. Magical healing of 6th level or higher, such as heal and regenerate, cures the internal injury, or if you spend ten days doing nothing but resting, it heals on its own.
8-10 Major Concussion. You have disadvantage on Intelligence checks, Wisdom checks, and Charisma checks, as well as Constitution saving throws to maintain concentration. Magical healing of 6th level or higher, such as heal and regenerate, cures the concussion. Alternately, it heals on its own in four weeks.
11-13 Minor Concussion. You have disadvantage on Intelligence checks. The concussion heals if you receive any magical healing; alternately it heals on its own in two weeks. If you already have a minor concussion, you suffer a major concussion.
14-16 Minor headaches. You have disadvantage on Wisdom checks. Magical healing of 6th level or higher, such as heal and regenerate, cures the headaches. Alternately, they will resolve on their own in two weeks.
17 - 20 Severe bruising. You suffer severe bruising over an extensive portion of your anatomy. Anytime you suffer bludgeoning or force damage, you suffer an additional point of bludgeoning or force damage. The bruising heals if you receive magical healing. Alternately, it heals on its own in 2 week.

Enforced Downtime

The campaign benefits when characters have time between adventures to engage in other activities. Allowing days, weeks, or months to pass between adventures stretches the campaign over a longer period of time and helps to manage the characters' level progression, preventing them from gaining too much power too quickly. Allowing characters to pursue side interests between adventures also encourages players to become more invested in the campaign world. When a character owns a tavern in a village or spends time carousing with the locals, that character's player is more likely to respond to threats to the village and its inhabitants. As the campaign progresses, the players' characters will not only become more powerful but also more influential and invested in the world. They might be inclined to undertake projects that require more time between adventures, such as building and maintaining a stronghold. As the party gains levels, the DM can add more downtime between adventures to give characters the time they need to pursue such interests. Whereas days or weeks might pass between low-level adventures, the amount of downtime between higher-level adventures might be measured in months or years.

Enforced Downtime means the character can only level up after they have spend a period of downtime. The DM decides how long this period of downtime must be.

Downtime Activities

Between adventures, the DM might ask you what your character is doing during his or her downtime. Periods of downtime can vary in duration, but each downtime activity requires a certain number of days to complete before you gain any benefit, and at least 8 hours of each day must be spent on the downtime activity for the day to count. The days do not need to be consecutive. If you have more than the minimum amount of days to spend, you can keep doing the same thing for a longer period of time, or switch to a new downtime activity. Downtime activities other than the ones presented below are possible. If you want your character to spend his or her downtime perform ing an activity not covered here, discuss it with your DM.

Sowing Rumors

swaying public opinion can be an effective way to bring down a villain or elevate a friend. Spreading rumors is an efficient, if underhanded, way to accomplish that goal. Well-placed rumors can increase the subject's standing in a community or embroil someone in scandal. A rumor needs to be simple, concrete, and hard to disprove. An effective rumor also has to be believable, playing off what people want to believe about the person in question. Sowing a rumor about an individual or organization requires a number of days depending on the size of the community, as shown in the Sowing Rumors table. In a town or city, the time spent must be continuous. If the character spreads a rumor for ten days, disappears on an adventure for another few days and then returns, the rumor fades away without the benefit of constant repetition.

Sowing Rumors
Settlement Size Time Required
Village 2d6 days
Town 4d6 days
City 6d6 days

The character must spend 1 gp per day to cover the cost of drinks, social appearances, and the like. at the end of the time spent sowing the rumor, the character must make a DC 15 Charisma (Deception or Persuasion) check. If the check succeeds, the community's prevailing attitude toward the subject shifts one step toward friendly or hostile, as the character wishes. If the check fails, the rumor gains no traction, and further attempts to propagate it fail. Shifting a community's general attitude towards a person or organization doesn't affect everyone in the community. Individuals might hold to their own opinions, particularly if they have personal experience in dealing with the subject of the rumors.

Selling/Buying Magical Items

Few people can afford to buy a magic item, and fewer still know how to find one. Adventurers are exceptional in this regard due to the nature of their profession. A character who comes into possession of a common, uncommon, rare, or very rare magic item that he or she wants to sell can spend downtime searching for a buyer. This downtime activity can be performed only in a city or another location where one can find wealthy individuals interested in buying magic items.

Legendary magic items and priceless artifacts can't be sold during downtime. Finding someone to buy such an item can be the substance of an adventure or quest. For each salable item, the character makes a DC 20 Intelligence (Investigation) check to find buyers. Another character can use his or her downtime to assist with the search, granting advantage on the checks.

On a failed check, no buyer for the item is found after a search that lasts 10 days. On a successful check, a buyer for the item is found after a number of days based on the item's rarity, as shown in the Salable Magic Item table. A character can attempt to find buyers for multiple magic items at once. Although this requires multiple Intelligence (Investigation) checks, the searches are occurring simultaneously, and the results of multiple failures or successes aren't added together.

For example, if the character finds a buyer for a common magic item in 2 days and a buyer for an uncommon item in 5 days, but fails to find a buyer for a rare item up for grabs, the entire search takes 10 days. For each item a character wishes to sell, the player rolls percentile dice and consults the Selling a Magic Item table, applying a modifier based on the item's rarity, as shown in the Salable Magic Items table. The character also makes a Charisma (Persuasion) check and adds that check's total to the roll. The subsequent total determines what a buyer offers to pay for the item. You determine a buyer's identity. Buyers sometimes procure rare and very rare items through proxies to ensure that their identities remain unknown. If the buyer is shady, it's up to you whether the sale creates legal complications for the party later.

Sallable Magic Items
Rarity Base Price (GP) Days to find buyer d100 roll modifier
Common 100 1d4 +10
Uncommon 500 1d6 0
Rare 5000 1d8 -10
Very Rare 50.000 1d10 -20
Selling a Magic Item
d100+Mod. You find...
20- a buyer offering 10% of the price
21 - 40 A buyer offering a quarter of the base price, and a shady buyer offering half the base price
41 - 80 A buyer offering half the base price and a shady buyer offering the full base price
81 - 90 A buyer offering the full base price
91+ A shady buyer offering one and a half times the base price, no questions asked

Running a Business

Adventurers can end up owning businesses that have nothing to do with delving into dungeons or saving the world. A character might inherit a smithy, or the party might be given a parcel of farmland or a tavern as a reward. If they hold on to the business, they might feel obliged to spend time between adventures maintaining the venture and making sure it runs smoothly.

A character rolls percentile dice and adds the number of days spent on this downtime activity (maximum 30), then compares the total to the Running a Business table to determine what happens. If the character is required to pay a cost as a result of rolling on this table but fails to do so, the business begins to fail. For each unpaid debt incurred in this manner, the character takes a -10 penalty to subsequent rolls made on this table.

Running a Business
d100+days Result
01-20 You must pay one and a halftimes the business's maintenance cost for each of the days
21 - 30 You must pay the business's full maintenance cost for each of the days
31 - 40 You must pay half the business's maintenance cost for each of the days. Profits cover the other half
41 - 60 The business covers its own maintenance cost for each of the days
61 - 80 The business covers its own maintenance cost for each of the days. It earns a profit of ld6 x 5 gp
81 - 90 The business covers its own maintenance cost for each of the days. It earns a profit of 2d8 x 5 gp
91+ The business covers its own maintenance cost for each of the days. It earns a profit of 3dl0 x 5 gp

Performing Sacred Rites

A pious character can spend time between adventures performing sacred rites in a temple affiliated with a god he or she reveres. Between rites, the character spends time in meditation and prayer. A character who is a priest in the temple can lead these rites, which might include weddings, funerals, and ordinations. A layperson can offer sacrifices in a temple or assist a priest with a rite. A character who spends at least 10 days performing sacred rites gains inspiration (described in chapter 4 of the Player's Handbook) at the start of each day for the next 2d6 days.

Gaining Renown

A character can spend downtime improving his or her renown within a particular organization or faction. Between adventures, a character undertakes minor tasks for the organization and socializes with its members. After pursuing these activities for a combined number of days equal to his or her current renown multiplied by 10, the character's renown increases by 1.

Crafting a Magical Item

Magic items are the DM's purview, so the DM decides how they fall into the party's possession. As an option, the DM can allow player characters to craft magic items. The creation of a magic item is a lengthy, expensive task. To start, a character must have a formula that describes the construction of the item. The character must also be a spellcaster with spell slots and must be able to cast any spells that the item can produce. Moreover, the character must meet a level minimum determined by the item's rarity, as shown in the Crafting Magic Items table. For example, a 3rd-level character could create a wand ofmagic missiles (an uncommon item), as long as the character has spell slots and can cast magic missile. That same character could make a +1 weapon (another uncommon item), no particular spell required.

You can decide that certain items also require special materials or locations to be created. For example, a character might need alchemist's supplies to brew a particular potion, or the formula for a flame tongue might require that the weapon be forged with lava.

Crafting Magic Items
Item Rarity Creation Cost Minimum Level
Common 100 GP 3
Uncommon 500 GP 3
Rare 5.000 GP 6
Very Rare 50.000 GP 11
Legendary 500.000 GP 17

An item has a creation cost specified in the Crafting Magic Items table. A character engaged in the crafting of a magic item makes progress in 25 gp increments, spending that amount for each day of work until the total cost is paid. The character is asslimed to work for 8 hours each of those days. Thus, creating an uncommon magic item takes 20 days and 500 gp. The DM is free to adjust the costs to better suit the campaign. If a spell will be produced by the item being created, the creator must expend one spell slot of the spell's level for each day of the creation process. The spell's material components must also be at hand throughout the process. If the spell normally consumes those components, they are consumed by the creation process. if the item will be able to produce the spell only once, as with a spell scroll, the components are consumed only once by the process. Otherwise, the components are consumed once each day of the item's creation. Multiple characters can combine their efforts to create a magic item if each of them meets the level prerequisite. Each character can contribute spells, spell spell slots, and components, as long as everyone participates during the entire crafting process.

Each character can contribute 25 gp worth of effort for each day spent helping to craft the item. normally, a character who undertakes this activity creates a magic item described in chapter 7, "Treasure." At the DM's discretion, the DM can allow players to design their magic items, using the guidelines in chapter 9, Dungeon Master's Workshop." While crafting a magic item, a character can maintain modest lifestyle without having to pay the 1 gp per day, or a comfortable lifestyle at half the normal cost (see chappter 5, "Equipment," of the Player's Handbook).

Carousing

Characters can spend their downtime engaged in a variety of hedonistic activities such as attending parties, binge drinking, gambling, or anything else that helps them cope with the perils they face on their adventures. A carousing character spends money as though maintaining a wealthy lifestyle (see chapter 5, "Equipment," of the Player's Handbook). At the end of the period spent carousing, the player rolls percentile dice and adds the character's level, then compares the total to the Carousing table to determine what happens to the character, or you choose.

Carousing
d100+level Result
1-10 You are jailed for 1d4 days at the end of the downtime period on charges of disorderly conduct and disturbing the peace. You can pay a fine of 10 gp to avoid jail time, or you can attempt to resist arrest
11-20 You regain consciousness in a strange place with no memory of how you got there, and you have been robbed of 3d6 x 5 gp.
21-30 You make an enemy. This person, business, or organization is now hostile to you. The DM determines the offended party. You can decide how you offended them.
31-40 You are caught up in a whirlwind romance. Roll a d20 . On a 1- 5, the romance ends bad, On a 6-10, the romance ends amicably. On a 11-20, the romance is ongoing. You determine the identity of the love interest, subject to your DM's approval. If the romance ends badly, you might gain a new flaw. If it ends well or is ongoing, your new love interest might represent a new bond.
41-80 You earn modest winnings from gambling and recuperate your lifestyle expenses for the time spent carousing.
81-90 You earn modest winnings from gambling. You recuperate your lifestyle expenses for thetime spent carousing and gain 1d20 x 4 gp
91+ You make a small fortune gambling. You recuperate your lifestyle expenses for the time spent carousing and gain 4d6 x 10 gp. Your carousing becomes the stuff of local legend.

Building a Stronghold

A character can spend time between adventures building a stronghold. Before work can begin, the character must acquire a plot of land. If the estate lies within a kingdom or similar domain, the character will need a royal charter (a legal document granting permission to oversee the estate in the name of the crown), a land grant (a legal document bequeathing custody of the land to the character for as long as he or she remains loyal to the crown), or a deed (a legal document that serves as proof of ownership). Land can also be acquired by inheritance or other means. Royal charters and land grants are usually given by the crown as a reward for faithful service, although they can also be bought. Deeds can be bought or inherited. A small estate might sell for as little as 100 gp or as much as 1,000 gp. A large estate might cost 5,000 gp or more, if it can be bought at all. Once the estate is secured, a character needs access to building materials and laborers. The Building a Stronghold table shows the cost of building the stronghold (including materials and labor) and the amount of time it takes, provided that the character is using downtime to oversee construction. Work can continue while the character is away, but each day the character is away adds 3 days to the construction time.

Building a Stronghold
Stronghold Construction Cost Construction Time
Abbey 50.000 GP 400 days
Guildhall, town or city 5.000 GP 60 days
Keep or small castle 50.000 GP 400 days
Noble estate with manor 25.000 GP 150 days
Outpost or fort 15.000 GP 100 days
Palace or large castle 500.000 GP 1200 days
Temple 50.000 GP 400 days
Tower, fortified 15.000 GP 100 days
Trading post 5.000 GP 60 days

Crafting

You can craft non magical objects, including adventuring equipment and works of art. You must be proficient with tools related to the object you are trying to create (typically artisan’s tools). You might also need access to special materials or locations necessary to create it. For example, someone proficient with smith’s tools needs a forge in order to craft a sword or suit of armor. For every day of downtime you spend crafting, you can craft one or more items with a total market value not exceeding 5 gp, and you must expend raw materials worth half the total market value. If something you want to craft has a market value greater than 5 gp, you make progress every day in 5-gp increments until you reach the market value of the item. For example, a suit of plate armor (market value 1,500 gp) takes 300 days to craft by yourself.

Multiple characters can combine their efforts toward the crafting of a single item, provided that the characters all have proficiency with the requisite tools and are working together in the same place. Each character contributes 5 gp worth of effort for every day spent helping to craft the item. For example, three characters with the requisite tool proficiency and the proper facilities can craft a suit of plate armor in 100 days, at a total cost of 750 gp. While crafting, you can maintain a modest lifestyle without having to pay 1 gp per day,or a comfortable lifestyle at half the normal cost (see chapter 5 for more information on lifestyle expenses).

Practising a Profession

You can work between adventures, allowing you to maintain a modest lifestyle without having to pay 1 gp per day (see chapter 5 for more information on lifestyle expenses). This benefit lasts as long you continue to practice your profession. If you are a member of an organization that can provide gainful employment, such as a temple or a thieves’ guild, you earn enough to support a comfortable lifestyle instead. If you have proficiency in the Performance skill and put your performance skill to use during your downtime, you earn enough to support a wealthy lifestyle instead.

Recuperating

You can use downtime between adventures to recover from a debilitating injury, disease, or poison. After three days of downtime spent recuperating, you can make a DC 15 Constitution saving throw. On a successful save, you can choose one of the following results: End one effect on you that prevents you from regaining hit points, or for the next 24 hours, gain advantage on saving throws against one disease or poison currently affecting you.

Researching

The time between adventures is a great chance to perform research, gaining insight into mysteries that have unfurled over the course of the campaign. Research can include poring over dusty tomes and crumbling scrolls in a library or buying drinks for the locals to pry rumors and gossip from their lips. When you begin your research, the DM determines whether the information is available, how many days of downtime it will take to find it, and whether there are any restrictions on your research (such as needing to seek out a specific individual, tome, or location). The DM might also require you to make one or more ability checks, such as an Intelligence (Investigation) check to find clues pointing toward the information you seek, or a Charisma (Persuasion) check to secure someone’s aid. Once those conditions are met, you learn the information if it is available. For each day of research, you must spend 1 gp to cover your expenses. This cost is in addition to your normal lifestyle expenses (as discussed in chapter 5).

Training

You can spend time between adventures learning a new language or training with a set of tools. Your DM might allow additional training options. First, you must find an instructor willing to teach you. The DM determines how long it takes, and whether one or more ability checks are required. The training lasts for 250 days and costs 1 gp per day. After you spend the requisite amount of time and money, you learn the new language or gain proficiency with the new tool.

3

OPTIONAL RULES

4

HERBALISM

Herbalism

Herbalism is the practice of using herbs, roots, spices, and other natural ingredients to create concoctions that produce some noteworthy effect. To find herbs, you make either an Intelligence (Nature) check or a Wisdom (Survival) check; the amount of time it can take to find herbs varies and is left to DM discretion, but it generally takes at least one hour per check. The following chart lists the difficulty class of the check required to find an herb based on its rarity. A player can only find an herb if he or she is in the correct environment in which the herb grows, and if the herb is actually present (again, DM discretion). For example, if a player decides to look for Cloudspur in a cold mountain environment, the DM decides if any Cloudspur is potentially present. The player than makes a skill check, and if he succeeds on a DC between 16-20 (the exact number is set by the DM), he finds enough Cloudspur to make at least one concoction.

Rarity DC
Common 5 - 10
Uncommon 11 - 15
Rare 16 - 20
Very rare 21 +

Creating Herbal Concoctions. You can craft a herbal concoction if you have the proper equipment such as vials, a herbalism kit, a workspace, and so forth. You must have all necessary ingredients, including the herb itself. You must be proficient with a herbalism kit to create herbal concoctions. For every day of downtime you spend crafting, you can craft one or more herbal concoctions with a total market value not exceeding 25 sp, and you must expend raw materials worth half the total market value. If a herbal concoction you want to craft has a market value greater than 25 sp, you make progress every day in 25 sp increments until you reach the market value of the herbal concoction. Multiple characters can combine their efforts toward the crafting of a herbal concoction, provided that the characters all have proficiency with herbalism kits and are working together in the same place. Each character contributes 25 sp worth of effort for every day spent helping to craft the herbal concoction.

Baneseed. Herb, rare

Requirements: 6 days of downtime, Baneseed, 75 sp of other expenses.

Market vallue: 150 sp.

Baneseed is the seed from various varieties of nettle. When distilled with ragweed and oil made from the body part of a particular type of creature, it can be applied as a bonus action to a melee weapon or 10 pieces of ammo for a ranged weapon. The weapon then deals an additional point of damage against creatures of the type from which the oil was made. The damage is of the same type that the weapon deals and the effect lasts for five minutes once applied to the weapon. Prickly Baneseed is found in temperate swamps and increases damage against abberations. Flowering Baneseed is found in cold forests and increases damage against beasts. Silken Baneseed is found in hot and arid deserts and increases damage against dragons. Waxy Baneseed is found in temperate hills and mountains and increases damage against fey. Stinging Baneseed is found in volcanic areas and increases damage against fiends. Leafy Baneseed is found in warm grasslands and increases damage against giants. Bitter Baneseed is found in shallow caves and grottos and increases damage against goblinoids. Sweet Baneseed is found in temperate forests and increases damage against humanoids. Mossy Baneseed grows in water and increases damage against monstrosities. Purple baneseed is found in steppes and increases damage against plants. White baneseed is found growing in graveyards and increases damage against corporeal undead (but not vampires). Black Baneseed is found in jungles and increases damage against incorporeal undead (it takes a part of the original corpse of an incorporeal undead to make oil of Black Baneseed). If Baneseed oil is applied to a weapon that has already had an oil applied to it, both oils cease to function. Baneseed has created something of a market for the body parts of creatures.


Battle Grog. Potion, uncommon

Requirements: 3 days of downtime, 1 vial, troll/ogre blood or bone. 37 sp of other expenses.

Market vallue: 75sp.

This reddish grog is specially mixed using the blood or bone of a troll or ogre. Although the mixing process does not enable the finished product to retain many of the properties of the creature's blood, its bravery is preserved. For 1 minute after you use an action to drink this potion, you gain advantage on all saving throws made to resist being frightened.


Bestra's Weed. Herb, rare

Requirements: 1 day of downtime, Bestra's Weed, 12 sp of other expenses.

Market vallue: 25 sp.

This foul-smelling, green weed is only known to grow in Southern Kale. It can be combined with misteltoe and made into a salve that has healing effects. When you use an action to apply the salve made from Bestra's Weed, you regain 1 hit point. This salve may only be applied once per day or it produces a toxic buildup in the body that causes the user to take 1d4 poison damage per additional application of the salve.

5

HERBALISM

Calbran's Fist. Herb, uncommon

Requirements: 3 days of downtime, Calbran's Fist. 37 sp of other expenses.

Market value: 75 sp.

This plant has lance-shaped leaves and flourishes in marshes. If mixed in a concoction of alcohol and garlic, it is known for increasing the physical strength of those who eat it, but only for a short time. When you use an action to consume the concoction, you gain advantage on Strength checks and Strength saving throws for 10 minutes. If you consume any additional doses of Calbran's Fist before you have completed a short rest, you feel nauseous, and the additional doses have no effect.


Citronellus. Herb, uncommon

Requirements: ½ day of downtime, Citronellus. 5 sp of other expenses.

Market value: 10 sp. This spikey green-leafed plant is found near the edges of grasslands and forests. When ground to a paste and mixed with flaxseed oil it can be used to ward off insects. When an action is used to apply the concoction to the skin or clothing, for the next 4 hours it will grant advantage on survival checks made to travel through swampy environments. If applied more than twice a day, it can breakdown fabric or cause rashes on the skin.


Cloudspur. Herb, rare

Requirements: 4 days of downtime, Cloudspur, 50 sp of other expenses. Market value: 100 sp.

Called Heilak by the dwarves and Mirena by the elves, this small plant has pale white leaves and grows in cold hills or mountains. When prepared in a mixture of vinegar and tyme, it has medicinal properties. When you use an action to ingest the preparation, you immediately get a saving throw to attempt to recover from one non-magical disease from which you are suffering (if the disease is amenable to recovery in this fashion). Attempts to ingest more than one preparation of Cloudspur per day result in vomiting. Corpse Leaf. Herb, rare Requirements: 3 days of downtime, Corpse Leaf, 37 sp of other expenses. Market value: 75 sp. This pale gray leaf grows in cool climes and is only found growing atop graves. When mixed in a concoction of green tea and fennel, it cures fatigue. Lesser orcs, to compensate for the greater endurance of hobgoblins and oluks, will often consume Corpse Leaf when engaging in forced marches. When you use an action to ingest the corpse leaf concoction, one level of exhaustion is removed from you. If you ingest more than one dose of Corpse Leaf within a 24 hour period, you gain one level of exhaustion per additional dose.


Elanor. Herb, common

Requirements: 1/8 day of downtime, Elanor, 0 sp of other expenses.

Market vallue: 1 cp.

This yellow, star-shaped flower is commonly found growing in full sunlight on warm or temperate hilltops. It is beautiful to behold, but the true properties of this flower are not seen until night. When crushed in a glass vial and shaken with acidic juice, it emits light equivalent to a candle for 8 hours.


Essence of Lavendra. Herb, common

Requirements: ½ day of downtime, Essence of Lavendra, 5 sp of other expenses.

Market value: 10 sp.

This plant is a shrubby perennial related to the common lavender plant. It grows wild in warm places of low rainfall. When mixed with normal lavendar and tarragon, it can be concocted into a salve which, when rubbed on the body as an action, will cause any creature attempting to track you by scent to do so at disadvantage. This effect lasts for 1 hour. Applying doses concurrently has no additional effect, but any number of doses can be used in succession.


Fluxweed. Herb, rare

Requirements: 3 days of downtime, Fluxweed, 37 sp of other expenses.

Market value: 75 sp.

This stalky, green-leaved plant has small purple flowers. It extrudes viscous oil when muddled with salt. It grows best in lowlands that are arid or that have only light rainfall. When its viscous oil is combined with alcohol and vinegar, it creates a foul-tasting potion that aids in disguising your appearance. When imbibed as an action, it grants advantage for one hour on Deception checks made while using a disguise kit to alter your appearance. If more than one dose is consumed in 24 hours, it will cause a distinctive pink rash on the checks that causes disadvantage on Charisma checks, and if used for more than 3 days in a row, the rash may become permanent. In this case, it can only be removed with a lesser restoration spell.


Honeycap. Herb, uncommon

Requirements: 1/5 day of downtime, Honeycap. 2 sp of other expenses.

Market value: 5 sp.

This wild mushroom has a golden color and grows in cool to moderate hills. Unlike most mushrooms, honeycap prefers areas of direct sunlight. Dwarves ferment Honeycap and use it to brew beer. Ironically, when crushed into a paste and mixed with heated goat's milk, a dose of honeycap, consumed as an action, will remove intoxication and make the user sober. Humblewort. Herb, uncommon Requirements: ½ day of downtime, Humblewort, 5 sp of other expenses. Market value: 10 sp. This small, thorny plant has bright red berries. It grows in temperate, wooded areas. When the berries are dried, they have a hallucinogenic effect that some find pleasant. When you consume a handful of Humblewort berries as an action, you hallucinate for 2 hours. During the 2 hours, you suffer disadvantage on intelligence, wisdom, and charisma checks and saving throws, although you feel blissful.

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Lotus. Herb, uncommon

Requirements: ½ day of downtime, Lotus, 5 sp of other expenses.

Market value: 10 sp.

This beautiful, water-growing flower, which looks like a water lily, is native to Yrrkune but was introduced into Kelerak by the Lord of Lust. It thrives in temperate climes and needs a very wet environment, like a lake or swamp, in which to grow. As a drug, it was much sought-after during the Dark Occupation, and lotus addicts still roam the streets of Dragonspur. The plant, when mixed with wild honey into a tea-like concoction, produces an extremely pleasant, soporific high that is also very addictive. A dose dulls physical pain and provides a sense of pleasure, warmth, and well-being: you have advantage on Constitution saving throws. Users are also very sleepy and are slow and addled. You have disadvantage on Dexterity checks, Dexterity saving throws, Intelligence checks, and Intelligence saving throws. You also have disadvantage on saving throws to avoid being put to sleep. These effects last for four hours. Lotus is also very addictive. When you take a dose of lotus, you must succeed at a DC 10 Constitution saving throw (without advantage from the drug) for each dose of lotus or become addicted. Each cumulative time the drug is used, the DC of the saving throw to avoid addiction goes up by 1, and the save never goes back down-- once an addict, always an addict. Once addicted, you will feel very compelled to take the drug and must succeed at a DC 15 Constitution saving throw or gain a level of exhaustion per day that the drug is not ingested (you will never gain more than five levels of exhaustion from failing to take the drug). If you take a dose of lotus during the addiction cycle, you immediately lose all levels of exhaustion gained from failing to take lotus. If you succeed at three consecutive Constitution saving throws from failing to take lotus, the addiction cycle is broken and you will stop needing to make a Consitution saving throw from failing to take lotus. You will still be susceptible to lotus, however, and if you ever take it again, the cycle will pick up where it left off. Taking more than one dose is dangerous-- two doses have no mechanical effects but increase your sense of pleasure and well-being. Three doses are likely to put you to sleep. If you imbibe more than three doses, you must succeed at a DC 13 Constitution saving throw or die. If you succeed at the saving throw, you are unconscious for 10 minutes and gain the poisoned condition for 4 hours.


Moon Blossom.Herb, very rare

Requirements: 20 days of downtime, Moon Blossom, 250 sp of other expenses.

Market value: 500 sp.

A pale white or blue blossom that grows in cool, swampy regions, this rare plant has extremely remarkable properties. Priests and paladins before the Dark Times prized it. They swore that it buttressed the spirit and protected against the walking dead. It can be mixed with common mint and brewed into a tea-like potion. When you use an action to drink this potion, you gain resistance to necrotic damage for 10 minutes. You gain 20 temporary hit points that protect you against undead attacks. During that 10 minutes, if an undead hits you with an attack that would reduce your hit point maximum, your temporary hit points are instead reduced by that amount. After the 10 minutes, any remaining temporary hit points disappear.

The temporary hit points gained by imbibing moon blossom tea will not protect against damage from any other source except attacks by undead that reduce your hit point maximum.


Moss Glow. Herb, rare

Requirements: 2 days of downtime, Moss glow, 25 sp of other expenses.

Market value: 50 sp.

This bright green moss is found in moist, subterranean areas which have been subjected to magical energy. When combined with dandelion wine and oregano and brewed into a concoction, this moss causes the imbiber's eyes to glow with a dim green light and allows him to see without light. When you use an action to imbibe moss glow concoction, you gain dark vision for 4 hours. However, because it causes your eyes to glow, you have disadvantage on stealth checks during this period. Imbibing another dose of moss glow concoction before you complete a long rest has no effect.


Nadria.Herb, uncommon

Requirements: 3 days of downtime, Nadria, 37 sp of other expenses.

Market value: 75 sp.

This common vine comes in three varieties: High Growth Nadria, Swamp Nadria, and Desert Nadria. Each looks essentially similar but differs in the color of its flowers, the location where it grows, and the effect it provides. High Growth Nadria has blue flowers and grows in warm mountains. It can be mixed with oregano into a concoction that can be consumed as an action; the imbiber gains advantage on dexterity saving throws for 10 minutes. Swamp Nadria has white flowers and grows in swamps. It can be mixed with rhubarb into a concoction that can be consumed as an action; the imbiber gains advantage on intelligence saving throws for 10 minutes. Desert Nadria has green flowers and grows in hot deserts. It can be mixed with purple passionflower into a concoction that can be consumed as an action; the imbiber gains advantage on charisma saving throws for 10 minutes. If you consume any additional doses of the same type of Nadria before you have completed a short rest, you feel nauseous, and the additional doses have no effect. When under the effect of Nadria, if you take an additional dose of Nadria (of any type), you become nauseous and lose all benefits from the herb.

Pipeleaf. Herb, common

Requirements: 1 day of downtime, Pipeleaf, 12 sp of other expenses.

Market value: 25 sp.

Many races throughout Farland smoke the dried leaves of plants. Old Norey pipeleaf is found in the hills of Zeland and is known for its charming effects among friends. Old Norey is commonly dried and cured with oregano and nutmeg. When a pipe of Old Norey is smoked, it forms a bond among all that have inhaled the smoke. For five minutes or until the smoke dissipates, all smokers have the charmed condition placed upon them by all the other smokers. Southern Star pipeleaf is typically found growing in Orland and Daven. Due to the heavy weight of its smoke, it is popular for blowing smoke rings, and some wizards have even learned how to integrate it into their prestidigitation tricks. As an action, a caster who is able to cast prestidigitation can inhale the smoke of Southern Star and exhale smoke in the shape of a small animal that hovers within range until the end of his next turn.


Pygmy Dogwood. Herb, uncommon

Requirements: 4 days of downtime, Pygmy Dogwood, 50 sp of other expenses.

Market vallue: 100 sp.

An undersized relative of the Kelerak-native tree that is more usually found in the northern reaches of Anaria, the pygmy dogwood resembles a sturdy grass, only readily identifiable when it turns bright red in autumn and winter. Unlike its cousin, it has only one use, and only to those who possess arcane skill. Harvested in midwinter with a cold iron blade, the stems must be dried under moonlight to awaken their potential. Then, when crushed to powder and inhaled, it triggers a frenzied state that greatly empowers magical abilities for a brief time, but tends to inhibit rational thought or other activity. When you take Pygmy Dogwood concoction as an action, for the next 5 minutes when you roll damage from casting a spell, you may reroll 1s. However, you suffer disadvantage to Intelligence checks and Intelligence saving throws during that time. If you take another dose of Pygmy Dogwood before you have completed a long rest, you must succeed at a DC 12 Constitution saving throw or take 1d6 poison damage, gain the poisoned condition for 1 hour, and lose all beneficial effects from the herb.


Rot Gut. Herb, rare

Requirements: 3 days of downtime, Rot gut, 37 sp of other expenses.

Market value: 75 sp.

This disgusting yellow root grows in warm climes and low elevations. The plant itself is a nettle-like variety of weed. When its root is extracted and mixed with essence of mandrake and the blood of a sentient creature, it creates a vile-tasting concoction that provides a sense of invincibility and numbness. It is often given to the dark races just before important battles because of its powerful medicinal effects. After having imbibed Rotgut Concoction, for the next 5 minutes, if damage reduces you to 0 hit points, you must make a Constitution saving throw with a DC of 5 + the damage taken, unless the damage is from a critical hit. On a success, you drop to 1 hit point instead.

The DC of this saving throw increases by 2 for each time after the first that damage reduces you to 0 hitpoints. If you take two or more doses of Rot Gut at once, you can make the Constitution saving throw when damage reduces you to 0 hit points even if that damage is from a critical hit, but when the duration expires you vomit for 10 minutes and gain a level of exhaustion. The level of exhaustion can be removed by all normal methods.


Sativum. Herb, uncommon

Requirements: 6 days of downtime, Sativum, 75 sp of other expenses.

Market vallue: 150 sp.

This bulb grows throughout the continent of Farland. It has bright green shoots and small white flowers. Though it is a commonly found herb, sativum must be picked while the plant is flowering in order to be effective. When the odorus bulb is dried, ground, and mixed with wood dust and silver powder, it has been known to repel vampires. When the mixture is sprinkled on one's clothing as a bonus action, it will grant advantage on wisdom saving throws against a vampire's charm action for 5 minutes. Alternatively the mixture can be added to olive oil and applied to a weapon as an action.

If within 5 minutes after applying the concoction to a weapon you use that weapon to deal damage to a vampire, the vampire's regeneration does not function until the end of its next turn. After damaging the vampire, the concoction that has been applied to the weapon is expended.


Sumash. Herb, uncommon

Requirements: 1 day of downtime, Sumash, 12 sp of other expenses.

Market vallue: 25 sp.

Native to the westernmost parts of Kale and the Wild Lands beyond, this bush, a more potent relative of the common sumac plant, can grow to nearly a meter tall. Also known as Urushberry, its distinctive red berries are arranged in spiraled clusters about a thin but sturdy stem. Most sumash varieties are harmless and often find themselves harvested to be ground up into garnish or seasoning, or, in the case of particularly adventurous architects, painted onto marble to provide a rich purple stain that is practically impossible to remove. There are a small number which are not harmless, however, and they are identifiable by their pink or white berries. Rashes and hives are common results of brushing up against a wild sumash of this type, whilst a fire that consumes them can make the toxins airborne and extremely dangerous if breathed in. Those who touch wild sumac must succeed at a DC 10 Constitution saving throw or suffer an allergic reaction that imposes disadvantage on Dexterity checks for the next hour (success just prevents the irritation from being severe enough to be mechanically significant).

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HERBALISM

Those exposed to the smoke of burning sumash must succeed at a DC 12 Constitution saving throw or suffer disadvantage on Constitution checks for the next hour and can only hold their breath for half the usual duration for the next 24 hours. White sumac in fruit can be carefully harvested and combined with chalk power to produce a dust grenade that counts as an improvised weapon with a range of 10/20 ft. On a hit, the target must succeed at a DC 12 Constitution saving throw or suffer disadvantage on Constitution checks for the next hour and can only hold its breath for half the usual duration during that hour.


Thodrun Lily. Herb, common

Requirements: ½ day of downtime, Thodrun Lily, 5 sp of other expenses.

Market value: 10 sp.

This waxy lily is aquatic and grows in fresh water in temperate climes. When brewed into a concoction with pansies and consumed as an action, you gain the ability to hold your breath for twice as long as normal. This effect lasts for 24 hours. Taking additional doses when under the effect of a previous dose has no additional effect.


Tumeric. Herb, uncommon

Requirements: 3 day of downtime, Tumeric 37 sp of other expenses.

Market vallue: 75 sp.

This bright orange rhizome is found in hot, dry climates under a stem-like green plant with bright purple flowers. When the root is dried and ground into a powder, it can be used as an orange dye, but it is especially prized for its medicinal qualities. When combined with olive oil and applied as an action to a disease-causing wound, it will grant advantage on the next saving throw made to end the effect of the disease.


Yellow Thistle. Herb, uncommon

Requirements: 2 days of downtime, Yellow Thistle, 25 sp of other expenses.

Market value: 50 sp.

This plant of the daisy family typically has a prickly stem and leaves and rounded heads of yellow flowers. It grows in temperate to cold climes and at low to medium elevations. When mixed in a concoction of chervil and hemp, it heightens the senses: You have advantage on perception checks. The effect lasts for 10 minutes. If you consume any additional doses of Yellow Thistle before you have completed a short rest, you feel jittery, your field of vision becomes yellow, and you gain no additional mechanical effects. Yellow Thistle reacts badly with Moss Glow. If you imbibe it while currently under the effects of Moss Glow, you immediately vomit and lose all benefits from both drugs.

-

The World of Farland

There are many typical assets that makes Farland the gritty world that it is. Because the light lost the war against the dark races a long time ago, the humans have somehow survived and adapted themselves on many fronts.

The Occupation

For almost 400 years, Farland is under control of the Goblinoid races. While true control is in the hand of more intelligent viceroys, the Goblinoids practice the instituted martial laws ever since the day the war is won by evil. This harsh brand of military rule is placed in order to instill fear in the populace. For example, anyone who even mutters a foul word against a Goblinoid is put to death, and random Humans are selected for floggings and torture daily. The Orcs even eat Human children, some of them while they still live. The laws differ by kingdom, still, there are certain similarities in the laws of all of the occupied kingdoms. They generally keep the existing structure of feudalism in place, but they make it much more stringent. They all institutionalize slavery in every kingdom, officially making each human either a slave or a vassal of any dark folk. The laws also legalize the social position of the dark folk, officially making humans second-class citizens in the kingdoms they had previously ruled and making certain things illegal to them. For example, humans are unable to enter into legal contracts without special dispensation, unable to bear weapons, and unable to eat foods reserved for dark folk. They need special permission to travel any distance. The laws also make even verbal resistance to any Goblinoid or Orc punishable by torture, and they make rebellion punishable by death. Finally, all of the laws requires worship of Vornoth and forbid worship or even mention of any other gods.

Politics

The former political structures are almost entirely dismantled. Indigenous human lords are generally executed for their part in the resistance to the Dark Conquest almost 400 years ago. Those who had not lent aid to the defeated armies of good were still executed as rebels and enemies of the state. Only a few native lords, generally those who had either aided the dark folk or who willingly offered them assistance after the conquest, were permitted to retain their lives, property, and a portion of their wealth. Generally these were minor lordlings who were often despised by the populace before the Dark Conquest. They were allowed to keep their titles and rank in order to help solidify the positions of the conquering dark folk; these lords knew the lands and people, and they could report potential traitors and help keep the populace in line. This also gave the people a semblance of normalcy, for they could still deal with their human lords-even though they knew who the real masters were.

Economy

A heavy rate of taxation is established on the Human slaves, further ensuring the wealth of the conquerors and the poverty of the indigenous peoples. The conquerors collect all of the coins of the kingdoms they occupied in order to melt them down and produce their own currency. They were made to facilitate trade and to remind the conquered people that their freedom and glory was a thing of the past.

Culture

Another focus of the dark folk is culture. The conquerors set out to instill the idea that the dark folk were racially superior to the Humans. This task is not easy, for the Goblinoid armies bring virtually no cultural advances to the lands they conquered; they offer no music, no literature, no mathematics, no better methods of agriculture. The only things they offer are better methods of making war and more brutal methods of killing, and even these things they do not teach to the conquered Humans, for fear that they might revolt. Moreover, they can not even stamp out the human languages, for their own language, the Dark Speech, is often unsuitable for discussion of anything except military matters and sadism. They insist that any Human who deals directly with dark folk on a regular basis adopt a dark folk name. They also insist that Humans refer to Orcs and other dark folk as "Luz-hal" or "Great Folk" and that they bow and mutter "Ur snog ut luz" or "I am a slave and you are great" whenever a Goblinoid passes by. Still, these are small and ultimately ineffectual measures at best. Thus their only method of establishing their cultural superiority is simply to repeat that dark folk are superior to humans and to reinforce these teachings with the whip. This method is only marginally successful, for though some Humans choose to ape the manners of dress and the gestures of their brutal masters, many Humans see that these claims of racial superiority are empty, and they never believe them. Thus the conquered Humans retain a modicum of pride in their hearts, and the seeds of future rebellion is sown.

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THE WORLD OF FARLAND

Religion

Their last and most important focus is religion. Any worship of the gods of goodness leads to execution after several days of excruciating torture, while worshiping a non-good god besides Vornoth is punishable by death after only a few hours of torture. Most of the temples in the occupied kingdoms are burned to the ground, though some are desecrated and re-sanctified to Vornoth. Some temples, however, resisted all attempts to burn them, and being near these holy places unsettled the dark folk so that they boarded these churches up and let them sit empty. The dark folk also commands that every resident of every kingdom must pray to the Dark One three times per day, as well as before every meal. Every citizen must sacrifice a fowl or barn animal to Vornoth once per year. If they fail to do so, they themselves are sacrificed to the Walker. After the Dark Conquest, the quality of life for the average human depends in large measure on where he had lived at the start of the occupation (travel of any distance was illegal; thus one stayed where one was.) Every Human's quality of life suffers, but generally those who lived in extremely rural or remote locales suffers least. They still must pay higher taxes, still must sacrifice livestock yearly, and still must pray to Vornoth on a regular basis, but they encounter few dark folk during their daily lives and thus are better off. True, an Orc, or Hobgoblin warlord, who dwells in a distant manor or castle, owns each Human serf, and these reprehensible lords are not above random acts of brutality and torture. Still, the dark folk are generally satisfied to leave the rural serf relatively unmolested if the human do his required duties. Humans who live in larger communities have it worse. Towns usually have a small garrison of dark folk soldiers, bullies who serve the local lord. These troops gladly enforce the harsh laws of the Occupation, and they also typically take pleasure in taking advantage of their social position and abusing the hapless Humans. If a town does not have a few dark folk soldiers, there are always unscrupulous and power-hungry Humans eager to fill the role. For Humans who live in towns, there is thus no way to escape the ever-watching eyes of the dark masters, and town-dwelling Humans spend almost every waking hour either working for the conquerors, praying to Vornoth as required, or fearing that they would be harassed, tortured, or killed for no reason.

The City Life

City dwellers have it worst. Cities, especially capital cities, have large garrisons of dark folk soldiers who patrols the streets on a regular basis. These soldiers rape and harass Humans with virtual impunity. Present everywhere in a conquered kingdom, spies are also of special concern in cities. The dark folk encourage citizens to inform on each other for a reward if there is any hint of treason, real or imagined, and in the poverty of large cities, one can not even look sideways at a passing Goblinoid without being reported as a rebel. Citizens dwell in constant fear of spies, wondering if their neighbors, customers, or even children are informants for the dark powers. The Goblinoids even make it known that it was illegal to think certain thoughts, and though this is generally perceived as an empty threat by most Human, the occasional use of the telepathy spell by dark folk shaman causes just enough uncertainty to keep people guessing. Crime is also an ever-present danger to city folk. Petty thieves and organized criminals learn quickly that any illegal activity directed against the dark rulers or their allies would be punished swiftly and with finality; thus they direct all of their crimes against the conquered Humans. The oppressed steal from the oppressed. The Goblinoid rulers care nothing for Human-on-Human crime as long as it does not interfere with their activities or, most importantly, hinder their control. Indeed, the shadowy rulers cultivate relationships with certain thieves guilds in order to employ them as organized spy networks. However, if these guilds grow too bold and agitate the populace too much, the dark folk sends shock troops on a surprise raid to destroy the guild and root out all its members, executing them mercilessly. The concern of the shadowy rulers is always control, and they can periodically send the message that the thieves guilds existed by their beneficence. For these reasons, life in the conquered kingdoms is a tissue of misery.

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THE WORLD OF FARLAND

Factions

As a character allied with one of the factions goes on adventures, he or she earns renown for accomplishing tasks that align with the faction’s goals. This is expressed in the awarding of renown points at the end of an episode or adventure. Completion usually earns 0 renown (no interest to the faction), 1 renown (some interest to the faction), or 2 renown (great interest to the faction). Each faction can award different renown points to adventurers. As characters earn renown, they progress in the ranks of their factions, granting them greater authority and additional benefits.

Advancement and Benefits


  • Rank 1: Initiate. This is the rank a character receives when first joining a faction. It is available at character creation or any time the character wishes to join. You can participate in any activities that are considered faction-specific for your faction. You can earn renown points in your faction and advance in rank. All new faction members receive an insignia of their faction, fashioned into a wearable or held item.
  • Rank 2: Agent. Agents have shown that they’re aligned with the faction’s goals, and are able to take on more responsibility. During certain adventures, you might be given the opportunity to undergo a secret mission on behalf of your faction. Completion of these missions might earn you additional benefits. Your character can be apprenticed to another higher-ranking adventurer from your faction.
  • Rank 3: Stalwart. Stalwarts are reliable faction members, entrusted with many secrets and deserving of additional support during adventures.
  • Rank 4: Mentor. Mentors are trusted voices within the faction’s leadership. They are looked upon as champions of the faction’s beliefs, and as mentors by those of lower rank. You can designate other rank 2 or 3 characters as your charge. You can have multiple charges if you wish.
  • Rank 5: Leader. Faction leaders are ensconced within the leadership of the faction and have a great degree of influence, guiding faction decisions. You gain the ability to make decisions on behalf of your faction and influence current and future faction direction.
Rank Renown Requirements
1. Initiate 0
2. Agent 3
3. Stalwart 10 1 secret mission
4. Mentor 25 3 secret missions
5. Leader 50 10 secret missions

Sylvan Safeguard

The creatures of the forest have withdrawn themselves from the goblinoid world. Deep within their ancient forests, they have hidden themselves in order to survive the occupation like a passing storm. Some, however, realize that just sitting idly will not be enough. These few are loosely organized to place the right force at the right time to protect the right source. They aim to preserve knowledge of the natural world and their means are magics from ancient mysteries and powers that descend from long forgotten era's.

The Sylvan Safeguard is a far-ranging group that opposes threats to the natural world and helps others survive the many perils of the wild. A ranger might be hired to lead a caravan through a treacherous mountain pass or the frozen tundra. A druid might volunteer to help a small village prepare for a long, brutal winter. Barbarians and witches who live like hermits most of the year might defend a town against marauding orcs or barbarians. Members of the Sylvan Safeguard know how to survive, and more importantly, they want to help others do the same. They are not opposed to civilization or progress, but they strive to prevent civilization and the wilderness from destroying one another.

Members of the Sylvan Safeguard are spread far and wide, and usually operate in isolation. They learn to depend on themselves more than others. Survival in a harsh world also demands great fortitude and mastery of certain fighting and survival skills. Members of the Sylvan Safeguard who dedicate themselves to helping others survive the perils of the wilderness are more social than others who are charged with defending sacred glades and preserving the natural balance.

The goal is to restore and preserve the natural order, keep the elemental forces of the world in check, keep civilization and the wilderness from destroying one another, and help others survive the perils of the wilderness.


  • Faction leader: Shadow Walker Balthinal 'Coress' of house Levan

  • Beliefs:
  1. The natural order must be respected and preserved.
  2. Forces that seek to upset the natural balance must be destroyed.
  3. The wilderness can be harsh. Not everyone can survive in it without assistance.

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FACTIONS

The Resistance

The resistance is an anti occupation movement that operates throughout all the conquered kingdoms. Mainly, they move within a faction of the thieves guilds in capital cities, for they know the thieves guild are corrupted by the goblinoid races. The Resistance aims are freedom and justice and their means are subterfuge, assassinations and stealth.

The Resistance is a young organization that has risen, been shattered, and risen again several times. Its longevity and resilience are largely due to its decentralized, grassroots, secretive nature, and the near-autonomy of many of its members. The Resistance have “cells” and lone operatives throughout Farland, although they interact and share information with one another from time to time as needs warrant. The Resistance' ideology is noble, and its members pride themselves on their integrity and incorruptibility. The Resistance do not seek glory, only the riddance of the Occupation.

Members of the Resistance are trained to act alone and depend on their own resources. When they get into scrapes, they don’t count on their fellow members to rescue them. Nevertheless, they are dedicated to helping one another in times of need, and friendships between members of the Resistance are nigh unbreakable. Masterful spies and infiltrators, they use various guises and secret identities to form relationships, cultivate their information networks, and manipulate others into doing what needs to be done. Although most members prefer to operate in the shadows, there are exceptions.

Their goals are to gather information throughout Farland,to discern the goblinoid movements within each region or realm, to assassinate important goblinoid leaders, to act openly as a last resort and to aid the weak, the poor, and the oppressed.


  • Faction leader: Damakos

  • Beliefs:
  1. One can never have too much information
  2. The Occupation must be destroyed.
  3. Killing one important Orc general is worth more that killing hundreds of goblins.

Mages' Collective

This group of mages conspire to operate outside the restrictions and oversight of the Occupation and the Faith. It is described as a shadow-guild of sorts, wherein members can submit requests relating to either the practice of magic or something more mundane and have them seen to without judgment. This collective manages to work in relative secrecy, their members discreet and their clients anonymous. As of yet, this collective has seen no sanction from the Lightbringers due to the Occupation. Casting spells is, however, forbidden, just like wielding weapons or armor. Given the inherent danger in defying the Faith or the Occupation (and thus risking being labeled a necromancer), it is no surprise that dealing with the Mages' Collective can be risky (if profitable) business.

A Black Tower is a prison for wizards ran by the unholy templars of Vornoth. They take any child from their families as soon as they show signs of magical ability. Once imprisoned, mages undergo a process of having a few drops of blood taken and placed in a phylactery, a vessel, often a glass vial, containing the essence or piece of a soul from a being. In this way, the soul of the imprisoned mage can always be tracked and shut down. Adult mages must undergo the Harrowing and on failure of this test they will become tranquil, a rite which make mages prone to suggestion and charm magic to function as trustworthy battlemages. If a mage succeeds the magical process called the Harrowing, they are allowed to keep their soul and become a full member of the Black Tower. The Mages' Collective fears the Black Tower with all it's confinement and imprisonment. They seek to free mages from the Black Towers wherever possible.

Their goals are to free every magic user from the bonds of the Faith and the Black Towers, to fight the prejudices about the mages wherever possible and to preserve magics and it's secrets at all costs.


  • Faction leader: Yedus Anglaround

  • Beliefs:
  1. Magic must be studied to be understood
  2. An user of magic is as dangerous as a knight with a sword. We teach them how to use magic.
  3. The Black Towers and the Lightbringers are a threat to us because of their ignorance.

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FACTIONS

The Lightbringers

This faction's primarily concern is undead, demons and feints. They specialize themselves with these creatures to locate and recognize them in order to destroy them or send them back to their own plane. Their aims are the liquidations of undead, demons, devils and feints and they use holy water, silver weapons and divine magic. This used to be a great faction before the Occupation. Now, it's members are disorganized and spread throughout many conquered kingdoms. They are most active still in the kingdom of Daven in the south.

Often portrayed as stoic and grim, the Order of the Lightbringers originated as the martial arm of the Faith. Armed with the ability to dispel and resist magic in addition to their formidable combat talents, the Lightbringers are uniquely qualified to act as both a foil for apostates–mages who refuse to submit to the authority of the Faith– and a first line of defense against the dark powers of necromancers and abominations.

While mages often resent the Lightbringers as symbols of the Faith’s control over magic, the people of Farland see them as saviors and holy warriors, champions of all that is good armed with piety enough to protect the world from the ravages of foul magic. In reality, the Faith’s militant arm looks first for skilled warriors with unshakable faith in the Maker, with a flawless moral center as a secondary concern. Lightbringers must carry out their duty with an emotional distance, and the Order would rather have soldiers with religious fervor and absolute loyalty than paragons of virtue who might question orders when it comes time to make difficult choices.

It is this sense of ruthless piety that most frightens mages when they get the Lightbringers’ attention: When the Order is sent to eliminate a possible necromancer, there is no reasoning with them, and if the Lightbringers are prepared the mage’s magic is often all but useless. Driven by their faith, the templars are one of the most feared and respected human forces in Farland.

Their goal is to destroy Demons, Devils, Feints and Undead, to preserve the civilized world from the dangers of magic and to protect the Faith at all cost.


  • Faction leader: Daug-Dagoth the Hunter

  • Beliefs:
  1. Demons, Devils, Feints and Undead are the enemy.
  2. Cultists that worship or aid the enemy in any way must be dismantled
  3. Faith in the Maker is the greatest weapon against evil.

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FACTIONS

Races

Humans

Humans are similar to the humans in multiverses everywhere. They come in all the varieties that we know on earth. They serve both evil and good, but tend to have a neutral bent. Most Humans are somewhat tolerant of other races, but their evil rulers have taught many Humans prejudices toward those of other races, as well as toward magic. Nevertheless, some of the most powerful lords are men.

There are six main Human Kingdoms in Farland. These are Farland the Great, Zeland, Orland, Daven, Kelerak, and Kale. Legend has it that all these kingdoms were born from the fall and sundering of the first Human kingdom, Aelfar the Ancient. Thus, all the different Human languages have something of a common root.


  • Anaria. The peoples of Anaria, the lands to the North and South of the Kelerak Mountains, are known to the more civilized peoples of Western Farland as the Northern Barbarians. The Northern barbarian peoples are made up of four large, loosely organized tribes. As a people, they call themselves Anar (Ah-nar) "Raiders," because they were known for harrowing and harassing the lands to the South. Three tribes live south of the Mountains and one tribe lives North of the Mountains. The Southern tribes divide themselves by what totem animal they honor. They revere the Elk, the Wolf, and the Cavebear, and call themselves the Hofvarar, Hildolfar, and Zul'gar. These peoples tend to be tall and strong, with white skin and blond or light brown hair. The tribe that lives North of the mountains, near the Ice Bay, honors the Seal and calls themselves the Einar. Their skin and hair is slightly darker than that of the southern Anar. They speak the human dialect of Kelevan called Anarian.

  • Cadocian. Frigid Cadocia to the north east is home to Humans who subsist through hunting, gathering, and fishing, and they have developed seaworthy ships to hunt whales. Most of the Cadocians live in small communities that move to follow the food source, but there are two cities in the land, although both are small. Cadocians tend to be swarthy-skinned, with dark, straight hair, narrow eyes, and heavy builds. They speak the Human dialect Cadocian.

  • Davonian. Haling from the kingdom of Daven, northern Davonians tend to be tall, slender, with oblong faces, strong chins, narrow features, and pale complexions, and they tend to have light eyes and light or blond hair. Southern Davonians tend to be stockier, shorter, broader-featured, shorter-headed, and darker-haired. They speak the human dialect Kelevan.

  • Erunian. Those humans who dwell in the southern continent of Eruna are know as Erunians. Most of the native humans of Eruna are dark skinned because of the baking sun, but Eruna is a huge place, and its human population varies widely, from the tall, nearly black-skinned people known as the Forolans, to the brown-skinned Turuk nomads who inhabit the Cen-Cela desert, to the light browned-skinned, highly civilized Ishians in the north of the continent. The people of Eruna speak many different human dialects.

  • Farlandish. The kingdom of Farland lends its name to the entire continent, and the people who dwell in the kingdom are known as Farlandish. They are a determined, regimented folk. Physically, they tend to be on the short side but strongly built, with swarthy skin and darker eyes, although blond, pale -skinned Farlanders are not unknown. They speak the human dialect Farlandish.

  • Kalias. The people known as Kalias come from the Westernmost kingdom in Farland, the land of Kale. The Kalias are a rough and ready, frontier-type folk. They tend toward pale skin, medium builds, and brown hair. They speak the dialect Kalish or what they call Kalais.

  • Kelerite. The Kelerites, from the kingdom of Kelerak, are a resilient and inventive folk. The average Kelerite is on the tall side, with a lean to medium build, rather pale and freckled skin, light to medium brown hair, and blue eyes. Yet as in every human population, there is diversity. They speak the Kelevan dialect.

  • Orlandish. Humans from the southern part of the kingdom of Orland tend to have dark hair and eyes and pale skin. They are usually of slender or medium build. Those from northern Orland have the pale skin of their southern cousins but their hair tends to be lighter and their build stockier. They speak the Kingdom Common dialect.

  • Zelish. Humans that come from the area of the kingdom of Zeland are called Zelish. A proud folk, they tend to be tall and heavy, with pale and freckled skin and brown or red hair. They speak the Kingdom Common dialect.

Elves

Elhil (singular Elhan), is the term for the immortal fey beings that dwell in the Belendale, and in smaller numbers in the Luvam Wood. They are a tall and beautiful race. They have less body hair than men do, and no facial hair. Elhil tend to be skilled in magic as well as with swords or bows. There is something mysterious about the Elhil, and they almost always conduct themselves in a fashion that is noble; Elhil tend to have the far-reaching goals of good in mind. Some contend, however, that the Elves' view of good means only absence of change. Outside of the Belendale and the surrounding area, Elhil are so rarely seen that they have almost become legendary. Elhil society is broken up loosely into families or Houses. An Elhil village is made of a varying number of Houses, very loosely arranged hierarchically. Elhil, of course, prefer to enjoy their long and contemplative lives without the hindrance of many rules, societal or otherwise.


  • Altarim. (equivalent to High Elves from the Players Handbook) The Altarim are the subrace traditionally thought of by the rest of Farland as Elves (though few other races know enough to distinguish Ranarim and Galan from Altarim). The Altarim of the Belendale live in bower-communities or tree-top fletches scattered throughout the vast woodland. Though technically ruled by the Galan of the Summervale, they are a free-spirited and independent people who are satisfied to spend their centuries in the Hinterlands tending their forests and gardens.

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RACES


  • Galan. (Glimmer Elves). The capital of the Elhil is the hidden Summervale, or Gloralion in High Speech. It is the very antithesis of the heart of evil in Farland, the Wintervale. The Elhil named it thus to signify the undying opposition of good to evil. This secret city is the home of the Galan or "Glimmer Elves." Dwelling so close to the Holy Swan of the Elhil, the Galan have basked in its magical energies for millenia, and it has changed them. They have grown more high-minded and proud than the typical Elhil; their concerns are no longer so much for the forests and the open skies that are beloved of the rest of their race; they care most for the pursuit of knowledge and the attainment of aesthetic perfection.

  • Ranarim. (called Sunder Elves, equivalent to Wood Elves from the Player's Handbook.) The Ranarim are an extremely isolationist group of Elhil. They have dwelt in their protected forest, the Luvam Wood, for millenia, cutting off all contact with other races, even other Elhil. In fact, their race has dwindled down to a small group of stiff-necked Elhan, and time has left their subrace behind. It seems that their race is basically fading away. Indeed, the Ranarim have become masters at hiding. Recently, however, a splinter-group of Ranarim have come to view this isolationist policy as counter-productive, and this group, against the orders of their leaders, have re-established limited contact with the elhil of the Belendale. Some of these Ranarim separatists have even appeared as diplomats and adventurers in the liberated kingdoms.

  • Dulim. (called Dark elves or Drow, equivalent to Drow from the Player's Handbook.) Like elves of the light, dulim (singular dulam) are immortal, ceasing to age upon reaching maturity at about the age of 25. The route to Faerie is closed to them, however, and if a dark elf is not killed, his fierce, fiery spirit eventually uses up his body. An aging drow simply fades away, until all that is left is a Dulim Shade, a creature neither dead nor undead (drow began growing slightly translucent in their sixth or seventh century, although this has no mechanical game effects. The dark elf language, called Mordularian ("Nighted Speech") is a twisted but morbidly beautiful tongue. It uses basically the same structure and phonemes as Altarian, although the language has mutated over the millennia. Still surface elves and their dark cousins have been equally surprised upon meeting to find that they can comprehend the other's tongue. This surprise quickly fades to bitter rancor, however, as the drow invariably attack the elves of the light. The history of the dulim includes few years of peace.

They have been forced to live in a constant state of warfare with other races and even themselves. While they rarely fight in open battle, preferring to use slaves for warfare, they are extremely concerned with power. War is a constant threat and for many dulim is even a hope. Dulim strive to prove their personal power at all costs. To do this they may even attempt to prove themselves in battle. To distinguish oneself in battle is extremely risky and few are willing to take such risks, but it is also one of the fastest and easiest ways to become a respected and distinguished member of dulim society. From their earliest origins as a race, the dulim have been involved in wartime intrigue, and to this day blackmail, trickery, and double-crossing are some of the most prized dulim strategies. Although originally members of the elven race, they have significantly changed since their original descent into the depths of Núrion. While far underground in the Dark Deeps, the Serpent of Twilight, an agent of the Demon goddess Salystra, led them to a place of great power where they were able to develop abilities far beyond those of their surface cousins. It would be considered a great insult to suggest to a present day dulam that he or she is part of the Elven race.

Half-Elves

When elhil and humans mingle, the result is a Frelehan, which literally means "elf-friend." Having elhil ancestry up to three generations ago (1/8 elhan) is enough to qualify one as a half-elven for the purposes of these rules. Half-elves tend to resemble good-looking, slightly taller humans. They have a slight air of nobility about them. A half-elf has the curiosity, inventiveness, and ambition of the human race, and the refined senses, love of nature, and artistic tastes of the elhil. In Farland they are rare and tend to live among the human race, although there are some half-elves that dwell with the elhil. They may or may not have pointed ears, but do tend to have facial hair, although slightly less than a human. Half-elves are truly a race without their own history or culture. They have always lived among either their elhil or human relatives. However, many of the human Lords from the old times had Elhil blood. The most famous of these was Zestor Half-Elhan, Lord of Kelerak, also called Wyvern Slayer, who ruled out of Dragonspur City. Queen Sybille the Diplomat is another famous Frelehan. Half-Drow. (Dultan) Drow elves are not above mating with slaves of other races for their own sexual pleasure. Female drow would never carry the offspring of such a union to term, but male drow may for their own amusement impregnate female slaves of other races. The result is a half-drow. Half drow truly have the worst of both worlds-- they are looked upon by other races as drow and by the drow race as slaves. Still, they have their own unique gifts that might allow them to make something of their low social position.

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RACES

Dwarves

Dwarves are a short, stocky, but invariably strong people. They have great powers of endurance, as well as a hardy resistance to cold and heat. Dwarves call themselves Khazak. Elves call them Nowgol. There are two types of dwarves: hill and mountain. They do speak the same language; however the hill dwarves use the Mithhaud alphabet, while mountain dwarves use the Wawmar alphabet. Hill dwarves tend to be slightly shorter than mountain dwarves, as well as darker complected. All dwarves treasure their beards and are loathe to cut them. Both sects of dwarves tend to live underground. They are excellent miners. The goblin races hate dwarves and attempt to kill them; they do not always succeed, as dwarves are fierce fighters. Dwarves are sober, pugnacious, introspective, suspicious, and greedy. They are also a strong force for lawful good. The ratio of males to females is 2:1. There have been five Dwarven kingdoms or Dwarfholds throughout history. These are, in order of their founding: Liferock, Wawmar, Khallin, Mithhaud (or Mt. Silverload), and Dorlhaud. The first three were primarily mountain Dwarfholds, and the last two were primarily hill Dwarfholds. Both types of dwarves freely lived in all the kingdoms, of course. There have also been other, smaller Dwarven communities, but these are the largest and only true Dwarven nations. However, over the course of history, the six holds have fallen and almost all dwarves have lost their homes and become wanderers. There have been many famous Dwarven heroes throughout history, and each clan and nation has its own favorite hero.

Gnomes

Tendenarruk as they call themselves, are a curious race. There are two more or less distinct racial types of gnomes: the tunnel gnomes, and the sun gnomes. Physical characteristics such as height and weight vary considerably between the types. Variation among individual gnomes is common, especially when comparing gnomes from different racial types, but variation is also common within these types. Gnomes, like Dwarves, usually boast substantial facial hair, though there are those gnomes who are without this attribute. Ears are slightly elongated and come to a bit of a point. This ear shape is not as pronounced as in the halfling race and some gnomes have ears that are shaped much like human ears. Eye color also varies but tends to be among the paler colors, light blue, green, or gray. Hair color is often gray, dull silver, or pale blond. Anomalies are not uncommon, as it is difficult to make generalizations of the race as a whole due to individual variation. As with many other attributes of the gnomes, age varies widely among the sub-races as well as among individuals.


  • Tunnel Gnomes. (Equivalent to Rock Gnomes from the Players Handbook) The tunnel gnomes, as they refer to themselves, are physically larger than their cousins the sun gnomes. They are mostly miners by profession but also are well known for their inventions and illusions. It is these gnomes that are most common in the gnomish homeland of Sheltinnobortanu.

  • Sun Gnomes. (Equivalent to Forest Gnomes from the Players Handbook) The last physical type of gnome are the sun gnomes. They live mostly in small homesteads and enclaves outside of the main mountain home of Sheltinnobortanu. It is these gnomes that are most widely known by outsiders, as they have the most contact with non-gnomes. When gnomes are associated with practical jokes and pranks, it is these gnomes who are largely responsible. These gnomes are most likely to work for outsiders and were considered prized servants for their loyalty during the height of the kingdom of Aelfar.

Halflings

Halflings, or hositan as they call themselves, resemble humans except they are half as tall. They tend to be slightly rotund and they always go barefooted. Their feet are leather-like with hair on the upper parts. They can, however, be very stealthy. There are three types of Halflings: Proudfellows, Stalwarts, and Hairfoot, the latter being the most common of a rare race. In Farland, Halflings have been in hiding since the dark times, and have become rare. Shires almost do not exist, only small villages. Nevertheless, halflings have been known to accomplish great deeds. Halfling communities and shires have their own independent style of government. A common form is the office of Thain and the office of Sheriff. Halflings dislike armed conflict and will avoid it at all costs. As a rule, they are conservative and conformist among themselves, following rules and laws, but have been known to enjoy causing a little mischief every now and then among the "big people." The only remaining shire is called Westdelving, located in and just south of the Forest of Blorn in Orland. Luckily the evil forces are still unaware of the existence of this shire. The greatest (and only) hositan hero was the former sheriff of Westdelving, Carl Paladin Merribuck, who was known for wielding the magical dagger Stealthheart.


  • Stalwarts. Stalwarts. (Equivalent to Stouts in the Players Handbook) Stalwarts are a tough, sturdy breed of hositan, broader and stronger than other halflings. Stalwarts tend to prefer prairies and open spaces, and unlike other halflings, they have a love of water. Stalwarts are the only halflings to regularly wear shoes. Sometimes they take pride in growing sparse whiskers on their chins.

  • Hairfoots. (Equivalent to Lightfoots in the Players Handbook) Hairfoots (or Hairfeet) are the most common of halflings, matching the general halfling description above. They are a peaceful, home-loving folk.

Tieflings

Tieflings are crosses between demons or devils and some hapless humanoid. Before the Dark Conquest, Tieflings were essentially unknown in Farland; while they certainly existed, they served the Dweller in her Eastern holdings and did not leave much mark on the histories. Since the Dark Conquest, however, these creatures have become more numerous. The population of Tieflings in Kelerak swells as some demon lord is producing Tieflings out of rape. Therefore the Kingdom of Farland has a notable Tiefling population. In Farland, almost every Tielfing serves a demon lord, however, many Tieflings of Kelerak have shown the inclination, strangely, to aid the forces of light. Still others have remained neutral, apart from human civilization.

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RACES

Dragonborn

Upon first occupying the dwarven Kingdom of Wawmar, the Dragonlord used his own blood to breed a race of guardians and warriors to serve him and to occupy his domain. At first this race of humanoid dragons served him faithfully, but over the years, a certain segment of this race grew dissatisfied. Finally, a tribe of Dragonborn rebelled against their Draconic Master and fled into the Wilderness of Northern Zeland and the Deadlands. There they eked out a living among the rough and broken highlands, occasionally trading with the wandering clans of dwarves that also inhabited this area, or serving as mercenaries for the highest bidders. However, they secretly took up worship of the gods of light, and over the centuries they never betrayed their new moral outlook. Other Dragonborn, though, still retain their evil bent and still dwell within the dread Fortress of Wawmar, serving the terrible dragon therein.

Half-Orc

Orcs as a race are short-lived, but they can breed with any race besides elves. The result is a half-orc. There are half-orc goblins, half-orc hobgoblins, etc. Most of these cross breeds look orcish, but 1/10 are sufficiently like the other race to pass for one, although there are tell-tale characteristics of half-orcs. Half-orcs of human stock are slightly shorter then humans, but stockier and stronger. Half-orcs are surprisingly nimble as well. They tend to have squinting eyes, sallow faces, slightly enlarged lower canines, and unmistakable ugliness. They are valuable to an evil ruler, as they are more intelligent than orcs and tend toward evil (although a PC half-orc may be any alignment). The human and demi-human races generally dislike them. Half-orcs are also a race without a heritage. There have been half-orcs as long as there have been orcs. Some half-orcs have distinguished themselves. One of these is the infamous Shagrat Blacktongue, High Priest of Vornoth.

Classes


Bard. Bards are not unwelcome in the occupied kingdoms, as long as they tow the party line and work to forward the propaganda of the occupation.


Cleric. Being a priest of anything but Bel or Vornoth, the Dark Walker, is forbidden in occupied lands under penalty of death, but the faithful do it anyway. They have learned to operate clandestinely, not indicating outwardly that they are priests and holding their religious ceremonies in secret and isolated places. They support the oppressed populace, providing them with spiritual guidance, and in return are supported by the masses. They must always beware of spies, however. Priests of Bel and Vornoth, especially the latter God, flourish in the Occupied Lands and are in high demand by the evil rulers, if not by the human population (even though the people are forced to attend Black Mass at the Church of Vornoth the Dark Walker). To receive prayers in Farland, priests must pray to one of the true Gods. A priest on the world of Núrion (where Farland is located) that worships any other God cannot receive prayers. .phb{ background : white;} .phb img{ display : none;} .phb hr+blockquote{background : white;}


Fighter and Barbarian Warriors are common. The Dark Races value military might and produce powerful fighters. Hobgoblins, particularly, produce great warriors. Human warriors, of course, are also plentiful. All are in demand.


Paladin. Generally worshiping the good gods, Paladins are rare in the occupied kingdoms and face great danger there. The evil rulers always attempt to eliminate Paladins. Many paladins do still exist secretly in these kingdoms, however.


Ranger. Good rangers certainly exist in the Occupied Kingdoms, they just face difficulties. Their skill in wood-lore, however, makes hide-and-strike tactics highly effective and limits their immediate danger. The evil rulers also employ rangers and ranger-groups. The most (in)famous of these are the Hounds, a slave-hunting force employed by the occupation.


Rogue. Thieves tend to prosper in the Dark Kingdoms and form powerful guilds. These guilds are often in league with the evil rulers and pay them large tithes. Rogues are also common, serving as operatives and skilled fighters or assassins.


Sorcerer, Warlock and Wizard. Magic and those who use it tend to be looked on with suspicion by the masses. Some mages have been burned at the stake as witches. It is not wise to flaunt a wizardly class in the occupied kingdoms. In fact, it is generally illegal under the rule of evil, but is often overlooked for a small fee. Of course the Dark Races employ magic users who are sanctioned by the evil rulers, and these are in fact fairly common. They wear a special badge or mark that indicates to the populace that these wizards are official and are not to be molested.

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PART 1 | FANCINESS

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